Hiring developers

BoundarylessEnterprise

Learn how Turing helped Ohi Technologies hire Silicon Valley-caliber Remote Software Engineers

Ohi Technologies What does Ohi Technologies do? Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions. What challenges did they face? Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent… View Article

Ohi Technologies

What does Ohi Technologies do?

Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions.

What challenges did they face?

Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent on unsuccessful hires made the process costly and fraught with risk

In a prior role, VP of Engineering Nick Blanchet estimated it takes three months from start to finish to hire and onboard an engineer successfully. These challenges led Ohi Technologies to turn to Turing to fill their software development job vacancies. However, they initially felt that remote-distributed teams create other problems. Ohi was concerened having remote engineers would reduce transparency in productivity. Additionally, having a team of remote software developers would make it challenging to align time zones globally, and the overhead of performance management tracking and other HR responsibilities had the potential to slow them down. Not to mention that the overall cost of engineering in a highly competitive market was pricing them out.

How did Turing solve their problem?

Turing’s solution brought speed and efficiency to Ohi Technologies’ hiring process by providing pre-vetted and readily available engineers that could hit the ground running with minimal ramp-up.

“From the first call with Turing to hiring a team of three highly skilled software engineers that were able to start effectively handling tickets took less than one month.”

Additionally, Turing’s post-match product enabled their team to maintain productivity in a distributed team by providing visibility into their engineer’s daily activities. Turing also made collaboration and communication seamless by enforcing a required time zone overlap and daily updates. Turing’s approach to sourcing, vetting, and hiring remote engineering professionals globally at a very competitive cost enabled Ohi Technologies to find quality developers outside of high cost-of-living areas.

Results

Ohi Technologies was able to engage three Turing software engineers to scale their development quickly. The new hires enabled them to get their product to market rapidly and increase product demand and scalability. Ohi sees Turing as their long-term partner for building on-demand teams of engineers.

 

By Sep 9, 2020
Hiring developers

With these companies leading the shift to remote work, Turing engineers are well-positioned to excel.

With at least half of the American workforce working from home, remote work is the new normal. And, as major company after major company announces their plans to extend remote work policies for the long term, it’s looking like this new normal won’t be ending any time soon.

It’s almost stopped being a surprise anymore. As each new announcement comes in of work-from-home policies being extended later and later than previously planned, most of us have stopped questioning, wondering, or even worrying. If anything, we find ourselves signing into our next scheduled Zoom meeting a little relieved. “Why would I even want to go back to the office?”

With at least half of the American workforce working from home, remote work is the new normal. And, as major company after major company announces their plans to extend remote work policies for the long term, it’s looking like this new normal won’t be ending any time soon. Here’s the break down:

Twitter

In many respects, Twitter was the trendsetter that made a more all-in approach to remote work “cool.” It was back in early May when Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey sent an email to all Twitter employees saying that they can continue working for home for as long as they see fit. That means remote work at Twitter can continue for as long as…forever. A spokesperson for Twitter revealed that this decision stemmed from Twitter’s “emphasis on decentralization and supporting a distributed workforce capable of working from anywhere.”

Square

Jack Dorsey is also CEO of Square, which is why the mobile payments company was quick to echo Twitter’s earlier announcement and make work from home a permanent option. And yes, they did use the word permanent.

Facebook

Just last week, Facebook announced its decision to extend the work-from-home option to July 2021. Although this policy change was largely driven by ongoing COVID concerns, in a live-stream posted to his Facebook page, Mark Zuckerberg revealed that he is also catching on to the larger vision of the future of work: “When you limit hiring to people who live in a small number of big cities, or who are willing to move there, that cuts out a lot of people who live in different communities, have different backgrounds, have different perspectives” It’s clear that Zuckerburg has seen the potential of remote work to advance opportunities for talent around the world. To his staff, he pitched the idea as a way of creating “more broad-based economic prosperity.” With this vision for the future, Zuckerberg has announced that it is going to “aggressively” ramp up the hiring of remote workers. The Facebook CEO now predicts that 50% of the company’s employees could be working remotely in the next 5 to 10 years.

Google

At about the same time as Facebook, Google also announced that its employees will have the option to continue working from home until at least July 2021. With concerns for how the COVID pandemic will impact families (especially given the possibility of having to provide home-schooling for children) Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote to his employees that he hopes the remote work policy “will offer the flexibility you need to balance work with taking care of yourselves and your loved ones over the next 12 months.”

Shopify

Back in May, Shopify joined Twitter in giving its employees the option to continue working from home indefinitely. Shopify CEO Tobi Lutke is also looking beyond the current COVID concerns and seeing the vision for the future of work. In a tweet, he explained that “COVID is challenging us all to work together in new ways. We choose to jump in the driver’s seat, instead of being passengers to the changes ahead. We cannot go back to the way things were. This isn’t a choice; this is the future.” What is this new future? Lutke made it very clear: “Office centricity is over”

What this means
With such large and influential tech companies like these transitioning to more permanent remote-work policies, it has never been a better time to be a Turing engineer. Opportunity is spreading across the globe. Silicon Valley is growing and Turing engineers are uniquely positioned to ride the wave of remote work jobs that is already here (with more coming). Like Zuckerberg’s sentiment, it’s time to stop cutting off the many brilliant and talented engineers who live in “different communities, have different backgrounds, and different perspectives.”

By Aug 13, 2020
COVID-19

Laid Off? Need Engineering Talent? Turing is Here to Help.

We are living in an unprecedented moment in modern history. People and companies are dealing with tectonic change coming from every direction. Unfortunately, our country and the world are going to go through a very painful rebuilding process. Many companies that were not fundamentally strong are going to go through layoffs and amazingly talented developers… View Article

We are living in an unprecedented moment in modern history. People and companies are dealing with tectonic change coming from every direction. Unfortunately, our country and the world are going to go through a very painful rebuilding process. Many companies that were not fundamentally strong are going to go through layoffs and amazingly talented developers are going to be let go.

But while some companies are downsizing or even closing entirely, others are hiring as quickly as possible. Turing wants to be the bridge between suddenly available engineering talent and positions that companies need to get filled now.

Our AI vetting system and global reach can help identify talent from all over the world and help that talent get matched with good-paying jobs at well-known companies. Our goal is to help America rebuild by connecting over 100,000 engineers with amazing jobs.

If you are a highly skilled engineer that’s been recently laid off, and you have expertise in the areas Ruby On Rails, JavaScript, Android or iOS Development, or Python, we may be able to help you find work very quickly. We also encourage you to share this post with your colleagues, who might also find themselves looking for alternate employment.

If you are a company that is in the enviable position of needing to scale up immediately to meet new, crisis-driven demand, we can assist you in finding and managing top-tier talent from around the world.

In addition to placing talent and filling open positions, we’ll be regularly updating this post with other companies that are seeking talent.

At this time, Turing is actively seeking individuals with the following skills:

  • Ruby on Rails Engineers
  • Mobile Engineers (iOS and Android)
  • JavaScript and Python (any JS framework)

Minimum requirements for these positions: 4 years experience, 2+ years experience working remotely.

To get started with Turing and be matched with open positions, the first thing you need to do is visit developers.turing.com and begin our vetting process. Once you’ve successfully completed our testing process, we’ll schedule you for a follow-up interview to make sure you’re ready for remote work and placement.

We know this is a challenging time for everyone. Turing wants to be your partner in finding work or scaling up, no matter where you are. Join us.

By Apr 22, 2020
Hiring developers

Vetting Candidates for Remote Work | Turing Hire

What you need to know about a candidate to make a great long-distance hire Hiring remote, global talent is tough. Most of the usual signals you rely on when hiring someone in the US don’t apply. You may not recognize the school a candidate attended. You may never have heard of the companies a candidate… View Article

What you need to know about a candidate to make a great long-distance hire

Hiring remote, global talent is tough. Most of the usual signals you rely on when hiring someone in the US don’t apply. You may not recognize the school a candidate attended. You may never have heard of the companies a candidate has worked for, and you may not have any idea if the people providing references are genuine. You also can’t rely on recruiters because they’re likely dealing with these same problems.

So how do you make sure a remote prospect is up to the task and won’t simply slow you down?

Overcoming sourcing challenges with rigorous vetting

When the usual means of identifying talent are likely to fail you, a new process is needed. At my current company Turing, we’re working to solve this problem. In this article, I’m going to share with you what I’ve learned during hundreds of technical screens. My goal is to help you identify best practices for vetting prospects and making sure your placements are going to be capable of delivering the results you require.

At Turing, we match developers from all over the world with positions at some of the world’s best and most interesting startups. Every time we make a placement, we put our reputation on the line. In other words, we can’t afford to make bad matches.

Since we are unable to rely on typical signals that would allow us to determine if someone is good enough for our clients, we’ve developed a system that provides unbiased feedback about a candidate’s skills in all of the areas critical for their remote-work success.

Core to our approach is a highly structured vetting process that incorporates sophisticated automated testing as well as detailed, in-person technical screening for individuals that have been able to successfully pass our coding examinations.

All of our testing is intended to help determine key facts about the experience, skills, and capabilities of a candidate. What we’re trying to understand through our tests and interviews will help us determine if a person has the skills they claim to have and whether they’re capable of performing basic tasks, managing projects, and people, or even leading entire projects from conception through implementation.

So, at a baseline, we’re trying to determine if someone can contribute to a codebase in a meaningful way. Maybe their skills only support accomplishing scoped, individual tasks. For example, can this person add a button that does x, y, and z on this web page and build it in a way that takes into account the full technical stack of the application?

Or can this person go in and add unit-testing to some kind of already written back end piece of logic? Generally, can they contribute within an already established structure and do things that won’t upset that structure, if given functional requirements?

Then, there’s a level of complexity beyond that. Can this person take a direction like “Hey, we want this larger-scope feature built?”, and successfully run with it? And can they execute at that level of complexity, something that is going to be composed of many tasks? Can this person, for instance, build a new signup flow, or build a new matching algorithm for some sort of matchmaking service? Can they individually make the sorts of principled tradeoffs in design and implementation that is inherent to successfully building at that level of complexity requires? Does this person have the sophistication to read between the lines and identify functional requirements implicit in a higher level and more coarse-grained specification?

But most critically, at both the task and feature-based levels, we’re trying to determine if this person will be able to contribute to an already established infrastructure, both technically and procedurally.

Identifying coders, leaders, and project architects

For more senior placements we start getting into higher levels of architectural complexity. Can this person start an entire project from scratch if they’re only given a general direction? If they’re tasked with building and deploying a new Android app that does something novel, can they deliver? Or if a company is expanding their product into a whole new space, can the developer take some rough business ideas and some rough sketches about how the company would like to go about doing this, and then build out a full-stack product, from the UI to the backend architecture to the design of the database models?

Can they manage the entire process from system architecture design to writing elegant implementations? Do they possess the depth and breadth of experience, as well just general horsepower, to be skilled enough to implement the MVP from the front end to the backend to the database as well as whatever infrastructure they’re going to use to actually deploy the code?

Even vetting somebody in terms of their technical acumen from a general level that seeks to get a signal on someone’s “seniority” is a really complex thing to do. Proper vetting needs to understand whether a person can design systems at a very high level. Can they understand how pieces fit together and how those pieces talk to one another? And then you start getting down into deeper levels of abstraction. Does a candidate understand how this feature fits into the greater scope of the product?

Can they assimilate to use the tools in a particular company? Can then adapt to the cadences and workflows of the team that they’re on, and work with other people to be part of a bigger whole? And then, at the task level, you need to determine if someone has fundamental baseline computer science abilities? Will they build efficient pieces of code? Do they understand notions of runtime and space complexity, and how that might apply to the code that they write, and the specific problems they are being asked to solve?

Are they able to conceptualize how their code will typically be used and how the stuff that they write will actually be run?

But the most critical thing to keep in mind is that it all comes down to code. Code has

a dual purpose.  It is going to be executed by a computer, and it’s going to be executed at certain cadences and using certain pieces of data and memory. But it’s also the stuff that people are going to read, and have to maintain.  People will have to go in and either edit or understand what your piece of code is doing in order to write their own piece of code, to modify or extend the functionality of a given application. Designing abstractions and writing code that can be comprehended by another human is extremely important.

AI versus Human Vetting

It’s almost an overwhelming list of skills that somebody requires to be considered a “good” software engineer. Trying to vet them all in an hour-long phone interview is very difficult. At Turing, we’ve realized that it’s possible to take the human out of it. To a point.

We do have an hour-long technical interview that we use with some of the most skilled developers that we’ve found on our platform, where we validate and extend upon things that we find through automated testing.

The technical interview allows us to screen for things that we find are very, very hard to test for. Of course, we’re interested in their communication capabilities, but we also like to test some technical things in an interview in addition to an automated test.

 Why Both?

During the course of developing Turing’s platform, we found that automated tests are really good for testing someone’s facility with specific technical stacks. For example, with programming languages like JavaScript, or Python or frameworks like React, or Node JS, or Laravel. We found that we can test someone’s knowledge of how to use those particular things pretty well in an automated test format.

We can get a really good signal as to whether somebody actually knows a particular framework or whether they speak a particular language. What’s really nice is that we can provide skill-validation to clients who are looking to get somebody up and running with the stack that they’re using as quickly as possible.

We’ve also found that we can automate testing of more general-domain kind of format

For instance, we can find out if the candidate knows how to build a server. Do they know and understand how a database is going to interact with a server, and how that server might interact with a front-end client? Do they know common design patterns that might be encountered in software engineering, and how those patterns might best be applied?

Is a candidate familiar with the types of algorithms they might encounter in software engineering? Or, given this piece of code in a language that you purport to know, can you tell us what you’d expect to happen if it was run with a certain type of input? We’ve found that those types of questions are really good for the types of automated testing that we currently do.

And we think that we get a pretty good signal on a developer’s mastery of a specific type of coding, say front-end development or back-end systems development, or mobile development or database design.

There’s really good tooling that we’ve built upon, that allows you to run code in a browser. And this allows us to do things such as automated live coding tests. We can do automated live algorithm testing in this sort of format with a significant degree of success, in terms of being able to test algorithmic correctness and efficiency.

We’re able to test whether or not somebody can write code that fulfills a particular function within a particular amount of time, and with a particular amount of like memory. We’re really excited to expand upon this method and see what further coding-based automated tests we can do.

Where automated testing breaks down

But even in a live coding format, there are holes that we have in terms of our automated tests.

Right now, it’s still very hard to get a computer to tell us what the elegance of somebody’s code is. Or how well it was organized, or how readable it is, or how well abstracted it is.

That’s where I really feel like a technical interview comes in handy. Because then I can present candidates with situations they might encounter during their work and they can walk me through how they’d design the solution to the problem. Doing this during a technical interview can help me understand what a candidate’s thinking is, and what kind of code, organizationally, they’d spit out to approximate a solution. This really helps me get into a prospect’s critical thinking. I can really see how they handle problems with uncertain specifications, how they ask questions about getting required specifications, and more generally a get a clearer idea of what the nature of their programming abstractions and elegance might be.

“Automated testing establishes a bar that filters people out. The in-person interview confirms the testing and tests the candidate on critical things that are currently hard to measure in an automated way.”

In general, what we’ve learned at Turing is that a well-designed and comprehensive automated testing facility is very cost-effective when you need to screen a large number of applicants blind. If I had to do an in-person interview, or even review and background check every candidate that wanted to work with Turing, there wouldn’t be enough hours in the day or enough days in the year.

And as our testing capabilities continue to evolve it makes our ability to find the best candidates and then invest our time where it’s most productive; doing technical screens for the top-tier applicants only.

What to do if you don’t have automated testing

In my next post, I’ll talk a bit about what you can do if you don’t have an automated testing facility. I’ll also dig into the way you can make the onboarding process simpler, and how you can spot early signs that a remote hire is struggling or even failing. Stay tuned!

By Feb 5, 2020
Hiring developers

How to Become a Remote Developer | Turing Jobs

My goal with this post is to tell you how to prepare yourself to get your first serious remote gig.

Thinking of becoming a remote developer and also want to work for a top tier company – hopefully, one based in Silicon Valley – but you don’t live in the US and you haven’t been able to secure a visa. Don’t despair. More and more of the latest valley startups have discovered that there’s a ton of talent offshore. This means that today might just be the best time in history to become a remote developer.

As someone that’s been working remotely about as long as it’s been possible, my goal with this post is to tell you how to prepare yourself to get your first serious remote gig. Today, I work for a company called Turing that places developers with opportunities all over the globe. We have some of the most advanced developer testing and vetting of any company in the world. What I’m about to share with you are key insights I’ve developed first, as a person that’s gone through Turing’s testing and vetting process as well as someone that now works on making that process even tougher and better.

First Things First, Be Prepared to Show Your Work

If you’re a developer applying right now, make sure that you’ve got a portfolio of some work that you’ve done before. It could be code you’ve submitted to GitHub. It could be some art design work that you have worked on. Maybe some websites that you’ve worked on, or maybe applications on the App Store.

Being able to showcase completed work is a very good thing. When we’re evaluating candidates that have passed our tests look at prior work. Additionally, many Turing clients want to see examples of the work a potential match has completed. The other thing that can help you stand out is if you have a good CV. But be careful! Attention to detail is critical. Make sure there are no errors in any documents you share to showcase your skill.  Nothing will shoot you in the foot the way an obvious mistake can. Believe me, I’ve seen so many people with errors in their CVs. To me, it’s a red flag if someone submits such an important document with mistakes. It says you’re careless and don’t take the time to check your work. So, no errors on CVs!

It’s also really important to have relevant information included in your portfolio. If you say that you have a particular skill make sure that there’s a corresponding project where you have actually used that skill. You’d be surprised how often someone will say they are proficient at coding in a certain language but then they don’t provide a single example of their work in that discipline. If you say you’re good at something, impress me by showing me an example of your great work!

Another critical skill for someone remote that wants to work for a high-profile US company is to have strong English. I know there are many people that are not native English speakers so it’s always good to make sure that your English is very concise. If this is a weakness, don’t ignore it. Do whatever it takes to make sure that you understand English very well and that you’re proficient in communicating in English, too. It’s the language your team is going to use, it’s the language you’ll be using to comment your code, and it’s probably the language of the people that will be using the product you want to help build. It’s easy to think people will overlook weak English skills, but if there are two candidates that have the same experience and have performed equally well on the automated tests, the one with better English skills will perform more strongly in a live technical screen.

How to Ace Your Automated Testing

The key to a superlative performance on automated testing is to be very well prepared.

Ensure, for example, that if your area of expertise is Python, you have prepared yourself in terms of the coverage of the topics in Python.

Be sure you’re prepared to cover that language end to end because the questions will try to test your coverage. The exam will cover your in-depth knowledge as well. if it’s algorithms and data structures that you work on be sure you know everything from the most basic concepts all the way to graphing algorithms and runtime complexity.

How Long the Automated Testing Should Take a Skilled Developer

For a skilled individual, I estimate that our current automated testing will require about eight hours. So, maybe a day. But of course, you may not want to put all that pressure on yourself to finish everything in one day. My recommendation is to allocate two hours per day and give yourself roughly a week to do just about all the MCQs in the qualifying exams.

Technical Exams – Where You’ll Sink or Swim

Just like with the automated MCQs, your performance during the technical interview will come down to how well you’ve prepared yourself. During a technical screen, we want to understand your in-depth knowledge. We also try to validate your performance on the MCQs and to understand if you have good working knowledge of design patterns.

For whatever programming language you use, it’s critical that you know everything from the basics to some really advanced techniques. And since we only pass the top 1% of developers you need to be prepared to talk about the projects that you’ve worked on in a little bit of detail.

You also need to be able to answer system design questions. System design questions are very important for a screener to understand how you are able to visualize a product from an architectural point of view. You should also be able to go deeper, all the way to the code, and even how it is going to be deployed on the final environment where it’s going to run. So, you need to be prepared to discuss all those things related to end-to-end software development.

For example, if you are a Python Django developer, you should be prepared to answer any questions relating to that language in depth. It’s also good if you’re capable of answering questions about system design and also planning as well.

Where Developers Get Tripped Up in the Technical Screen

During a technical screening, most people are not prepared to go into detail on algorithms and data structures. Again, it comes back to preparation. We often have people complain that they don’t need to know this stuff for the work they do but being competent with both algorithms and data structures is very important for high-level work. Another thing I see a lot of candidates struggle with is when we ask them to explain various concepts in English. I’ll emphasize again, that having strong English communication skills is vital to ensure placement with top-tier US opportunities.

Final Words of Advice

To wrap up this post, I want to emphasize a couple of the key points I’ve made above. In Silicon Valley, it’s very competitive to find good work. If you’re trying to get into this market as a remote engineer, you have to be truly exceptional. Turing’s tests are designed to filter out all but the best candidates to be matched with our clients.

If you’re really serious about securing one of these most in-demand positions, my advice is as follows:

  • Preparation is critical. If you have a weakness, work to improve it
  • Don’t underestimate the importance of understanding algorithms and data structures because if you do, you’ll fail the MCQs or the technical screen
  • Make sure your ability to communicate in English is up to the task. If it’s not, take action to improve it
  • Be sure to have a portfolio that includes projects related to the languages you claim to know
  • Polish your CV. Scrub it of mistakes because if you don’t, we’ll notice them and that will hurt your chances

Next Time

In my next post, I’ll be talking about what you should expect once you’ve passed the MCQ and technical screens, how candidates are matched with opportunities and what you should do to ensure that your onboarding process goes as smoothly and quickly as possible.

 

By Feb 5, 2020
People walking over calendar painted on floor
Hiring developers

How to Keep Remote Software Teams on Schedule

For many managers, remote teams are deemed undesirable because of the manager’s inability to physically supervise them, ensuring that they’re staying on schedule and completing tasks in a timely manner. This concern can deter companies from hiring remotely, which is a shame due to all the benefits that come with employing remote workers- such as… View Article

For many managers, remote teams are deemed undesirable because of the manager’s inability to physically supervise them, ensuring that they’re staying on schedule and completing tasks in a timely manner.

This concern can deter companies from hiring remotely, which is a shame due to all the benefits that come with employing remote workers- such as increased productivity and innovation, as well as decreased costs.

Luckily, in this article, we’re going to explore some methods as to how to keep your remote software team on schedule.

1. Make sure that remote hires have both a passion for the project, as well as the necessary skills to successfully complete it.

During the hiring process, look for candidates with an obvious interest in the project that you’d potentially be hiring them to work on. After all, it’s no secret that an employee will be more dedicated to a project that they are passionate about.

Additionally, test during the hiring process that the employee possesses the skills that they need to complete the project to your standards. A skilled employee is less likely to get caught up in obstacles than one who is less proficient.

2. Make sure that you are aware of potential problems and how they may occur.

As a manager, being prepared for a disaster and knowing what to do in the event that it happens, is the best way to keep a team moving forward. When assigning a project to a remote employee, do your research first and have a plan in place in the event of the worst case scenario. This will ensure that if the problem pops up, you’ll be able to fix it quickly, while keeping the employee on schedule to complete the project.

3. Have regular check-ins so you know whether or not your remote employees are on schedule.

It’s difficult to feel as though you’re maintaining control over an employee when they aren’t with you in the office. Fortunately, with tools such as Skype, Google Hangouts, and Slack, it’s extremely easy to periodically check-in with remote workers.

Check-in using video chat or simply a text chat. Ask the employee what they’ve completed, what they’re currently working on, and what they have left on their agenda for the day. If anything seems like it’s taking longer than it should or you think that another part of the process needs to be prioritized, don’t hesitate to voice your concerns. Open communication is the biggest key to success when it comes to managing remote workers.

4. Assign deliverables to be completed in small chunks so that you have insight into how the project is going.

Break the overall project into small parts and assign due dates for each section. This way, you can see each part of the puzzle as it’s completed, giving you an early look as to how everything is going to fit together to form the final product.

Doing this will also allow you to catch any potential mistakes early on in development, saving everyone the headache of having to make corrections down the road.

5. Assign buddies to your remote workers.

Assigning buddies to remote employees is a great way to keep them on track. Additionally, by putting two minds together to complete a project, you’ll double their chances of success.

Buddies can be local employees or another remote employee- whichever you’d prefer. Either way, assigning pairs when it comes to remote work is an amazing way to increase productivity, problem-solving ability, and more.

6. Have a defined “problem escalation” process, which remote employees can use.

Similarly to our point in #2, acknowledging potential problems and deciding how to solve them before they happen, is a great strategy when it comes to keeping employees from drifting off course. Nothing causes a project to be set back like the unearthing of massive problem, late in the game.

While you, as a manager, should be aware of potential problems and methods for solving them, you should also make your remote employees aware of the problems and solutions. This way, if everything goes wrong, you’ll know that both you and your remote worker understand what went wrong and how to go about fixing it.

7. Have a plan for securing additional resources, in the event of a problem.

Should a problem arise, be sure that you have members of your local team on standby to help your remote employees out. When it comes to a crisis, you should have an “all hands on deck” policy, so that your remote worker doesn’t feel as though they’re an abandoned, sinking ship.

8. Build in extra time and resources.

If a project must absolutely be completed by a specific date, then be sure to start it early, setting the initial “due date” for weeks (or even months) before it is necessary to have it finalized. Additionally, take on the expense of being prepared by having extra resources available to employees while they work on the project.

Extra time and resources may seem unnecessary at the start of a project, however, you and your employees will be grateful for the cushion, should a problem occur.

Once again, when it comes to a project being completed by remote employees, knowing how to dodge and fix problems before it’s a necessity, is crucial to keeping remote workers on schedule.

A remote worker that winds up off-schedule wastes company time and money, potentially even throwing off the launch of a new product.

To get the most value out of your remote employees, you’ll need to adjust your management styles to allow for as little error as possible.

Getting the most out of remote workers starts with the people that you hire. At Turing, we thoroughly pre-vet our remote software engineers, requiring them go through multiple rounds of interviews, testing, and background checks. After that, we only accept the top 1% of applicants into our database, guaranteeing that our customers are matched to the highest quality remote workers.

Visit our website to start building your remote team with Turing.

By Feb 5, 2019
Globe
Hiring developers

Hiring Remote Workers vs. Local Workers

There are times and situations when hiring remotely is better for your company, while other times, the opposite is true. Part of being a good manager involves being able to differentiate between these scenarios and make the best hiring decision for the company. To help you in doing just that, here is a brief guide… View Article

There are times and situations when hiring remotely is better for your company, while other times, the opposite is true. Part of being a good manager involves being able to differentiate between these scenarios and make the best hiring decision for the company.

To help you in doing just that, here is a brief guide as to what questions to ask yourself when it comes to hiring locally vs. remotely:

1. How long will I need this employee for?

If you’re looking for a long-term employee then hiring someone locally and full-time is your best bet. However, if you just need to bring someone on board to complete a short-term project, you should consider hiring remotely. Remote workers very often operate as freelancers, meaning that they jump from project to project, rather than looking for full-time positions with companies. Due to this, if looking to assign someone to a short-term project, a remote worker will complete the job at a reduced rate, without any long-term commitments necessary.

2. How much money is in the budget for new hires?

The number one reason as to why companies opt for remote employees over local talent, is the cost. Employee benefits, taxes, and so on, wind up costing companies a fortune for every new hire. These expenses can be avoided by hiring a remote worker. For one, remote hires and freelancers don’t require benefits. For another, if you’re hiring remotely from the global market, certain U.S. taxation isn’t a factor, saving you money in that department as well.

3. Are my current employees stuck in a creative rut?

By working with remote workers, you gain access to a diverse group, including members from different disciplines, from all over the world. Diversity and different viewpoints often lead to innovative breakthroughs and new ideas among teams.

Introducing remote employees to your existing teams can help spark some fresh, creative ideas and solutions so if your workplace needs to shake things up, hiring remotely may be the way to go.

4. Do I have the necessary tools to work seamlessly with a remote employee?

You typically don’t meet your remote workers and because of this physical gap, communication becomes even more imperative than usual. It’s for this reason that tools such as Skype/ Google Hangouts, Slack, Trello, and Time Doctor become so important. These tools, designed to improve communication between team members (especially remote team members) can help you, as a manager, do everything from keeping in contact with remote employees to monitoring their work hours.

Before hiring remotely, you should look into these tools and be sure that you know how to access and use them. This could make the difference between a positive experience and a negative one, when it comes to remote workers.

There are many benefits when it comes to hiring remotely, rather than locally. If hiring a remote worker seems like the best fit for your company, it is absolutely something to consider.

If you’re interested in bringing a remote software engineer on board, look into hiring through Turing. Turing matches companies with elite, pre-vetted remote software engineers. By accepting only the top 1% of applicants into our engineer database, (only after they’ve gone through a series of interviews, tests, and background checks), we can guarantee the absolute highest quality remote engineers in the world.

Visit our website to start building your remote team, today.

By Feb 4, 2019
People working on their computers
Hiring developers

How to Attract the Right Remote Workers

Once you’ve decided to hire remote workers, finding the right candidate is half the battle. The best way to go about this is to adopt a “pull approach”, instead of a “push approach”. This means attracting the best candidates to you, as opposed to going out and scouting for workers. Here are a few great… View Article

Once you’ve decided to hire remote workers, finding the right candidate is half the battle. The best way to go about this is to adopt a “pull approach”, instead of a “push approach”. This means attracting the best candidates to you, as opposed to going out and scouting for workers.

Here are a few great ways to do just that:

1. Sell Vision, Not Just Tasks

You’re telling a story; you’re selling dreams; you’re putting your vision out there to inspire millions of people. Do not advertise your jobs as a mundane task-list, so to speak. Sell the vision- really, sell it. Talk about how the position can enhance the life of a remote worker, as well as the skills they’ll be using and learning. There is neither a shortage of talent nor of companies so it’s very important to make yourself stand out if you want to work with the best talent.

2. Communication

Communicate to your candidates how you will be working together, what your management process is like and what working at your company is like. Your language and grammar should make them want to be a part of the team. This isn’t about showmanship either- actually believe in and bring to life the picture that you paint. Satisfy your teams. Remember, too, that word of mouth spreads like wildfire.

3. Benefits

Add benefits for your freelancers. This can be along the lines of a monetary benefit or a free laptop. Small investments set you apart from the vast majority of companies recruiting remote workers. Most firms don’t offer any benefits to their remote workers, because their motive is to save as much money as possible. However, spending a few hundred dollars here and there on your remote employees will immediately make your company more appealing, as well as increase retention rates.

Half of the work when it comes to the process of hiring remote employees is finding the right candidates in a stack of applications. By drawing numerous qualified individuals to you, you will never be short of options, allowing you to hire the absolute best, in terms of talent.

By Feb 1, 2019
People staring at computer screen
Hiring developers

How to Find Great Remote Talent from Around the World

The world is your oyster. If you’re a recruiter or manager, do not limit yourself to within the confines of narrow domestic walls and borders—look everywhere! Obviously, the global talent pool is significantly larger than that of any one state or nation; however, with so many people, it can get a little tricky to find… View Article

The world is your oyster. If you’re a recruiter or manager, do not limit yourself to within the confines of narrow domestic walls and borders—look everywhere!

Obviously, the global talent pool is significantly larger than that of any one state or nation; however, with so many people, it can get a little tricky to find your ideal candidate. Here’s a list of five techniques that you can implement to hire and retain great talent from around the world:

1. Take the road less traveled.

Make sure that you’re looking for talent in the right markets. You may be tempted to seek out candidates from big cities and countries- India, for example. However, it’s important to note that you’d be competing with multiple, large companies for talent in popular locations. Google, Microsoft, Facebook- all of these tech giants recruit heavily from countries like India and China.

If you want to find the right talent and spare yourself a battle against bigger companies, you’d be better off looking for employees in less popular locations. At Turing, for example, we recruit extensively from Eastern European and South American markets, which aren’t the first places that come to mind when you’re thinking about hiring abroad. Due to this, we’re easily able to get great talent at a fraction of the cost. As a result, we’ve seen both our productivity and efficiency increase.

So, if you want to find great talent around the world, you must be innovative and willing to take the road less traveled.

2. Referrals

Birds of a feather flock together. According to a recent LinkedIn report, nearly 50% of businesses in the US get quality hires through employee referrals- so, ask around. If you have remote workers already, see if they know of any eligible candidates that would like to work for you. Incentivize this process (monetary benefits work very well) and you’ve got yourself a solid plan to find quality talent from anywhere in the world.

3. Pull vs. Push

Exercise a “pull” appeal over a “push” appeal. This means that you’re drawing clients to you, rather than going out of your way to find them.

The best way to do this is to establish your company as a place that people all over the globe are attracted to and want to work for. Highlight your global talent and inclusion; express how your business will change the world; and elaborate upon the global reach of your operation.

In essence: create your brand. If you’re able to position yourself as an employee-centric company that provides a plethora of benefits to its workers and actively brings on global talent, then you’re far more likely to attract amazing employees.

4. Diverse Work

Nothing acts as a better incentive than the promise of performing exciting and diverse tasks. Make sure to involve your employees (local or global) in tasks that are engaging and exciting.

Many roles involve a heavy amount of grind work, a.k.a. repetitive, monotonous tasks from 9 to 5. However, even in such roles there is always a way to make things exciting. Make it a point to involve your global employees in interesting and different projects, giving them the chance to grow. A healthy work environment will make for happy employees, which, in turn, will inspire positive word of mouth.

5. Post in Niche Communities

There are three key steps to finding great talent: network, network, and network.

In a 2017 report, conducted by LinkedIn, 95% of companies (surveyed in regards to their recruiting trends) stated that they’ve successfully hired from LinkedIn, while 24% pointed towards Facebook and 16% used Twitter. This just proves that you should be using social media platforms to your advantage. After all, thanks to the internet, the world is (quite literally) at your fingertips. That being said, be aware that different countries use different social media platforms so depending on which country you’re targeting, you may have to use a unique platform to post jobs. Make sure that you’ve done your research and are educated on how the country virtually functions.

Additionally, be sure that you’re attending local and international conference, as they make for great networking events. The further that you expand your circle of connections, the more likely you are to come across great talent.

Hiring talent beyond national and state borders means a larger talent pool, allowing you to connect with (and potentially hire) more talented workers, at a lower cost, than your competition.

If you look beyond the obvious markets when it comes to hiring globally, utilize social media and networking platforms, leverage your employees’ connections with a referral program, and position yourself as a company of choice for people all over the world; you will find your company full of international talent.

By Jan 31, 2019
People sitting at a table working on a computer
Hiring developers

Why You Should Hire the Best Talent, No Matter Where They Are Located

When it comes to deciding who to hire, most employers specifically look for applicants located in proximity to the office. Candidates who can physically come into the office every day is a preference shared by many companies. However, this approach (while traditional) does not always guarantee that the applicant awarded the position, is the most… View Article

When it comes to deciding who to hire, most employers specifically look for applicants located in proximity to the office.

Candidates who can physically come into the office every day is a preference shared by many companies. However, this approach (while traditional) does not always guarantee that the applicant awarded the position, is the most talented candidate available nor the best fit for the job.

Hiring remotely is a fairly new concept in the business world. Thanks to the internet, as well as advances in technology over the last few decades, it is now entirely possible for a company located in the United States to employ a worker from India, without anyone having to relocate.

The rate of people around the world opting to work remotely is continuously rising, allowing more and more companies a chance at choosing employees from a far wider talent pool. Despite this, many companies are too deterred by the thought of hiring someone who would never step foot into the office, to consider the benefits of remote workers.

Here are just a few benefits that come with hiring remotely that you should consider before writing off these applicants:

1. Remote workers are proven to have increased levels of productivity.

In an experiment conducted by Stanford professor, Nicholas Bloom, it is proven that employees who work from home have higher levels of productivity and concentration. After all, these workers are in a comfortable environment, don’t have to worry about a commute, and have better work-life balances. Their happiness translates into quality work. Bloom recorded a 13% improvement in performance among remote workers.

2. Research show a decreased rate of employee turnover, among remote workers.

In the same study, Bloom found that resignations from companies dropped 50% when employees were working remotely. After all, employees leave their jobs for a multitude of reasons, popular ones being too long of commute, need more time with their family, moving, etc. By taking away the stipulation that they MUST be present in the office to keep their position with the company, there are far fewer reasons for an employee to feel the urge to hand in their two weeks notice.

3. Companies are proven to save money when their employees are working remotely.

Fewer employees within the office means that, as an employer, you don’t have to rent as large of an office space. Additionally, if your company pays for employee meals, transportation, relocation, etc.; you can cut all of those expenses by hiring remotely.

There are a vast number of benefits when it comes to hiring remotely, so why wouldn’t you choose an insanely talented remote worker over a locally based, yet mediocre, employee?

The concept of remote employees may seem strange at first, but the world is rapidly changing. Every year, more and more talented individuals decide to work remotely and this trend is only going to continue. Don’t miss out on the best talent that the world has to offer, solely because that employee works remotely.

By Jan 29, 2019
Silhouette of a person standing on top of a rock with the sun setting behind
Hiring developers

Personality Traits to Look for in Remote Workers

When it comes to hiring remote workers, looking only at knowledge, skills, and experience is simply not enough. Regular hires will be in the office alongside you, day after day, giving you the opportunity to get to know them, supervise them, and directly communicate with them. When it comes to an employee working remotely, there… View Article

When it comes to hiring remote workers, looking only at knowledge, skills, and experience is simply not enough.

Regular hires will be in the office alongside you, day after day, giving you the opportunity to get to know them, supervise them, and directly communicate with them. When it comes to an employee working remotely, there will be a bit of a natural disconnect. Due to this, personality traits are just as important (if not more important) than basic qualifications as your company is deciding who to hire.

The following is a list of personality traits to lookout for while sifting through applicants:

1. They’re a self-starters.

Working remotely requires a great deal of self-discipline. You want to be sure that the worker you hire is independent and able to complete tasks in an organized, timely manner, without you having to constantly check up on them.

In order to find the applicants who possess this trait, look for prospects who have worked remotely in the past. Be sure to check their references and look at work samples.

2. They follow through.

Make sure that potential hires are able to both start and finish projects in an efficient and professional manner. A good way to test this is by giving potential candidates a trial assignment or small project. This will allow you to gauge everything from their work ethic to skill level.

3. They’re organized.

Organization is key for a remote worker to be successful in their position and keep themselves on task, outside of an office setting. It’s a bit more difficult to really see who excels at organization and who doesn’t, but trial assignments, reference checks, and a Skype interview may give you a decent idea.

4. They have the ability to communicate effectively.

You need a remote worker who can communicate with you as effectively as possible. This can be a difficult task from miles and miles away, but communication is necessary to the success of the employee. Pay close attention to their communication skills during the interview process. Be sure that their messages are well-written and to the point, that you speak (and understand) the same language, and that they’re open to speaking over the phone or video chat throughout the day, as necessary.

5. They have the ability to handle criticism.

There may come a time where you may need to correct your remote worker. If they don’t handle criticisms with grace, then that could potentially cause serious problems over the course of their employment. Find someone who is positive and excited to learn and grow. To find these applicants in the stack, give some constructive criticism to the candidate during their trial assignment. How they react to it (check facial expressions, word choice, etc.), will tell you all you need to know.

Remote workers are the future of industry. While hiring someone to work outside of the office may seem like a strange and problematic concept, problems with remote employees can easily be avoided if you hire the right people.

If possible, try to hire through a website like Turing. Turing focuses on finding job placements for remote software engineers and only takes the top 1% of applicants. This means that every remote worker we match with a company, is guaranteed to be the best in terms of quality and performance.

By Jan 28, 2019
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Hiring developers

What to Avoid When Hiring Remote Teams

Remote teams are everywhere. I’d call them the future, but really, they define the present. In the United States alone, 43% of the workforce has already spent part of their career working remotely. If trends are anything to go by, this number is only going to continue to grow. As a manager, hiring (and retaining)… View Article

Remote teams are everywhere.

I’d call them the future, but really, they define the present. In the United States alone, 43% of the workforce has already spent part of their career working remotely. If trends are anything to go by, this number is only going to continue to grow.

As a manager, hiring (and retaining) remote workers can be a challenging task. You’re looking for someone who is skilled, flexible, and a good communicator, while also being able to divide their time and prioritize tasks. With such a broad set of criteria and a seemingly bottomless well of candidates to choose from, narrowing down to the perfect candidate can feel a lot like finding a needle in a haystack.

If you’ve found yourself unsure of how to proceed with filtering through your stack of applications, simply follow this 4-point guide, outlining what to avoid when hiring remote teams.

1. “Versatile Communicator, Wherefore Art Thou?”

Sound communication is the spine of any team. Therefore, it is important to hire people who are skilled (and versatile) communicators.

For instance, you don’t want to hire an engineer who only uses e-mail as a means to communicate. Though text is the most common method of communication among remote teams, you’d ideally want a freelancer who is flexible and adept at different mediums—video, in particular.

This probably goes without saying, but it’s also extremely important to hire workers who are comfortable with the language that you operate in. Very frequently, companies prioritize other qualities over communication and this just harms them in the long run.

Other important qualities to search for are the abilities to both follow clear tasks and prioritize cleverly. Additionally, you want to be sure that the remote workers you hire are a good fit for your company’s culture.

As a manager, your focus should be on the big picture and in the long run, communication has a substantial and directly proportional impact on productivity. By ensuring that you choose candidates who are able to communicate effectively, you will avoid a lot of potential problems in the workplace.

2. Hard v. Soft Skills

Say you’re hiring a remote engineer and have two candidates to choose from:

  •       Tommy, who’s very talented but has low self-direction and interpersonal skills;
  •       Timmy, who isn’t quite as talented as Tommy but is more organized, alert and passionate.


Who would you pick?

If you’re working within a remote setup, it’s probably a better choice to hire Timmy.

Things like self-direction and motivation can be worked on if you’re working in the same physical space, but it can get harder remotely. Due to this, it’s important to ask behavioral questions, along with skill-based questions, in order to understand what kind of person the candidate is, in addition to their knowledge of the field.

Arguably, in the remote space, a more adept and sharper communicator is better to have than a very talented employee with limited communication skills.

3. Time Zones

AMs and PMs flipped over their heads—what is time in the modern age?

True, in today’s modern world, it’s easier to communicate across hemispheres, but still, it’s certainly better to work with someone operating out of a similar time zone.

When hiring candidates for remote work, ensure that they are comfortable with your company’s hours of operations. At the same time, you must also be cognizant of their time schedule and be flexible accordingly.

4. Avoid Crowded Talent Pools

You don’t want to be where everyone else is. If you can help it, search for workers in less crowded markets. For example, if you’re looking to hire remote engineers, look in Eastern Europe rather than India.

The reasoning behind this is that in bigger and more popular markets, you’ll end up competing against business giants like Google and IBM for human resources. Any situation that involves you battling it out against a company like Google will be an uphill task that should be avoided at all costs.


Hiring remote workers can be tricky, but if you follow the right steps, it can be an optimal solution for your company. By knowing what to avoid when it comes to hiring remote talent, you will be able to easily narrow down candidates, making the process far less tedious, and therefore, less daunting.

By Jan 23, 2019
For hire sign
Hiring developers

5 Tips for Hiring Remote Engineering Teams

If your company is looking to hire remote engineers for the first time, you may have a lot of questions about how to go about starting the process. If you’re searching for a beginner’s guide on where and how to begin locating the field’s best remote talent, then look no further. Here are 5 tips… View Article

If your company is looking to hire remote engineers for the first time, you may have a lot of questions about how to go about starting the process.

If you’re searching for a beginner’s guide on where and how to begin locating the field’s best remote talent, then look no further.

Here are 5 tips to help you hire the best remote engineering teams:

1.  Similar Working Style

Hiring remote workers is a lot like entering a relationship. You’re a certain person; they’re a certain person. For things to work out, you have to have enough in common that you’re able to gel together.

Here’s an example: You’re a manager that prefers video calling over e-mail. You work with remote teams and video calling allows for a more personal conversation, which is very important to you. Ergo, it is imperative that the remote workers you employ are comfortable with using video chat technology as a means of communication.

It is important that your ideals and the ideals of your remote team mesh, especially since you will not have the opportunity to see them every day around the office in order to establish a working relationship.

2. Quality Above All Else

Half the challenges of working with a remote team can be solved if you work with high-quality, talented engineers. The best engineers are 800% more productive than average engineers—go for the best.

As intuitive as this seems, it’s something a lot of companies overlook. As much as possible, do not settle; always intend to get the best resources for your company—quality above all else.

3. “You Say Good Morning When It’s Good Night”

A large part of working together is communication. Due to the simple fact that solid and frequent communication is difficult across time-zones, working with remote engineers, based in a similar time-zone as your company, will make everyone’s lives easier.

Of course, each company is unique, and you may have different priorities, but looking for persons in your time-zone is ideal. For example, at Turing we’ve implemented a sophisticated machine learning system that pairs you with an engineer that works best with your specific situation. Since the system is intelligent, it adapts to your dynamic and ever-changing needs without any difficulty.

(Read more about our machine learning system here.)

4. Don’t follow the masses.

A Yoda-esque statement, perhaps: Look not where others are, but where they are not.

For example, if a big company—Google, let’s say—has lots of offices in India, then you’re better off not looking for developers there because you’ll be competing with them for remote engineers. While engineers from India may be a solid option depending on what your company’s needs are, any situation that involves you competing with Google is going to be a battle that you probably won’t win.

When searching for remote talent in the field of engineering, it’s best if you can find a market that’s not as saturated and look for workers there. Counter trends; think and look strategically.

5. Hire Pre-Vetted Engineers

If you’re a manager that’s looking to hire remote engineers, credibility is going to be a big factor. You want to make sure that the engineer you’re hiring is trustworthy and optimal for your company.

The solution? Pre-vetted engineers.

To be “pre-vetted” means that the remote engineer looking for employment has already passed various HR tests, from interviews to testing to background checks.

For instance, at Turing, you can choose from a selection of hundreds of pre-selected engineers that’ve gone through a rigorous interview and testing process.

(Read about our engineer selection process here.)

At the end of the day, the most important thing when hiring remote teams is finding reliable and trustworthy workers. It’s also important to find engineers that align with your company’s values and ethics. Be smart and strategic when it comes to the market you search in and, finally, always look for the best engineers.

Use Turing to search from over hundreds of pre-vetted and qualified engineers that match your company’s needs and circumstance.

By Jan 23, 2019