Turing News

WestBridge and Foundation Capital Leaders Join Turing's Board of Directors
Turing News

Turing Welcomes Foundation Capital & WestBridge Capital Leaders onto its Board of Directors

Turing is pleased to announce that it is expanding its Board of Directors, adding Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, and Sumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital. The move comes after Turing’s $32-million Series B funding round, led by the $3.3-billion fund WestBridge Capital, along with Foundation Capital, which led Turing’s earlier… View Article

Turing is pleased to announce that it is expanding its Board of Directors, adding Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, and Sumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital. The move comes after Turing’s $32-million Series B funding round, led by the $3.3-billion fund WestBridge Capital, along with Foundation Capital, which led Turing’s earlier round. To date, Turing has raised nearly $50 million in venture funding.

Turing’s co-founders Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishnan will continue to serve on the company’s Board. Siddharth is Turing’s CEO, while Krishnan is Turing’s CTO. The new, expanded Board will meet in January. 

“Ashu and Sumir are both highly accomplished venture capitalists that bring a wealth of experience in scaling B2B tech companies,” said Siddharth. “Ashu has unique expertise in working with technical founders of AI-enabled businesses such as Cohesity, Eightfold, and Fortanix, among others. Sumir’s experience and connections in the IT services industry will enhance Turing’s go-to-market strategy, especially among enterprise customers,” he added. 

Turing founders Siddharth and Krishnan discovered the massive potential of globally distributed teams while successfully scaling their last AI-backed content start-up with exceptional remote talent. Propelled by the global shift to remote work, Turing taps into a giant global pool of remote software developers to help firms hire in markets such as Silicon Valley and New York, where hiring and retaining the best software engineers is often difficult and costly. Turing rigorously vets software developers for a Silicon Valley bar. 

Turing has achieved dramatic growth over the past two years growing revenue 17X over the last 14 months, from $700K to almost $12 Million. The company has also had nearly 200,000 of the world’s top software developers sign up for the Turing jobs platform. Additionally, several high-profile Silicon Valley technology companies have also come on board as customers. The global pandemic has compelled companies to adopt remote-first and remote-friendly policies, which has opened up gigantic global talent pools from which to recruit. 

If you’re a company that needs to scale engineering capacity quickly, Turing can help you hire Silicon Valley-caliber developers who work in your timezone. If you’re a highly-skilled developer who wants to take the global tech market by storm, you can apply to top remote Turing jobs.

By Jan 8, 2021
Turing Raises $32M in Series B
Turing News

Turing Announces $32M in Series B led by WestBridge Capital and Foundation Capital

In a landmark moment in Turing’s history, the company is delighted to announce that it has raised $32 million in a Series B Round. The current investment was led by $3.3 Billion Investment Fund WestBridge Capital, with earlier round lead investor Foundation Capital, Altair Capital, Mindset Ventures, Frontier Ventures, and Gaingels participating. This milestone comes… View Article

In a landmark moment in Turing’s history, the company is delighted to announce that it has raised $32 million in a Series B Round. The current investment was led by $3.3 Billion Investment Fund WestBridge Capital, with earlier round lead investor Foundation Capital, Altair Capital, Mindset Ventures, Frontier Ventures, and Gaingels participating. This milestone comes close on the heels of the company’s $14 million seed funding in August. The latest round takes the total investments made into Turing to nearly $50 million from top funds and high-profile investors. 

WestBridge, for instance, has a wealth of experience in investing in global IT companies like Cognizant and GlobalLogic. Turing’s unique data science and AI-driven approach to talent acquisition motivated WestBridge to invest. Says Westbridge Capital’s Managing Director Sumir Chadha, “Instead of setting up buildings and having developers work inside offices, Turing creates a new category with talent in the cloud. Top-tier talent sourced by software, vetted by software, matched by software, and managed by software, massively increasing the scalability and efficiency of the business”.

For Ashu Garg, Managing Partner at Foundation Capital, Turing’s economic potential stood out right from the get-go — and continues to do so. Said Mr. Garg, “Today, I’m bullish on the economic potential of companies like Turing that will be foundational to the future of remote work. Such is our belief in Turing that we led the company’s seed round, and we are a major participant in their current raise”. 

Turing’s turbo-charged growth story

Driven by the massive global shift to remote work, Turing taps into a worldwide pool of developers to help companies remotely hire top developers in Silicon Valley, New York, and other tech hubs, where hiring and retaining top engineers is highly competitive and typically expensive. 

Since going live 14 months ago, Turing’s revenues increased 17x, from $700K to $12 million in November 2020. Over this period, the company’s client-base has expanded considerably. Current customers include VillageMD, Lambda School, Plume, Ohi Tech, Carta Healthcare, and Proxy.

Turing’s remote developer cohort has continued to expand. Over 180,000 developers from across 10,000 cities have signed up to the Turing jobs platform (compared to 150,000 in August). About 50,000 of these Turing developers have gone through the company’s AI-powered automated vetting on the platform. By 2022, the company believes it will create over 1000 remote developer jobs. 

The massive shift to remote work has helped accelerate Turing’s growth. The past five months have achieved two years’ worth of transformation across many industries, particularly those that rely on software development. This year’s pandemic has led companies to embrace remote-friendly policies and open up to hiring global talent. As Turing investor Daniel Ibri, Managing Partner at Mindset Ventures, puts it, “Remote work is an unstoppable trend worldwide that just got accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic. Turing is leading the market, and we are bullish on its ability to grow and thrive.”

How Turing plans to leverage this momentum

Turing’s co-founders Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishnan, have major plans for the firm’s future. They intend to use this additional capital to scale Turing’s platform, enhance its AI-driven automated matching software and workforce management tools, and grow its product, sales, marketing, and communication teams. 

Of course, this wouldn’t be possible without Turing’s investors. The company extends its heartfelt gratitude to its backers for putting their faith in the company’s vision and team. In addition to the aforementioned, Turing’s investors include Adam D’Angelo (Facebook’s first CTO and CEO at Quora), Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, and Scott Banister, Beerud Sheth (the founder of Upwork), Founders Fund, Chapter One Ventures (Jeff Morris Jr), Plug and Play Tech Ventures (Saeed Amidi), UpHonest Capital (​Wei Guo, Ellen Ma​), Ideas & Capital (Xavier Ponce de León), 500 Startups Vietnam (Binh Tran and Eddie Thai), Canvas Ventures (Gary Little), B Capital (Karen Appleton P​age, Kabir Narang), Peak State Ventures (​Bryan Ciambella, Seva Zakharov)​, Stanford StartX Fund, Amino C​apital, ​Spike Ventures, Visary Capital (Faizan Khan), Brainstorm Ventures (Ariel Jaduszliwer), Dmitry Chernyak, Lorenzo Thione, Shariq Rizvi, Siqi Chen, Yi Ding, Sunil Rajaraman, Parakram Khandpur, Kintan Brahmbhatt, Cameron Drummond, Kevin Moore, Sundeep Ahuja, Auren Hoffman, Greg Back, Sean Foote, Kelly Graziadei, Bobby Balachandran, Ajith Samuel, Aakash Dhuna, Adam Canady, Steffen Nauman, Sybille Nauman, Eric Cohen, Vlad V, Marat Kichikov, Piyush Prahladka, Manas Joglekar, Vladimir Khristenko, Tim and Melinda Thompson, Alexandr Katalov, Joseph and Lea Anne Ng, Jed Ng, Eric Bunting, Rafael Carmona, Jorge Carmona, Viacheslav Turpanov, James Borow, Ray Carroll, Suzanne Fletcher, Denis Beloglazov, Tigran Nazaretian, Andrew Kamotskiy, Ilya Poz, Natalia Shkirtil, Ludmila Khrapchenko, Ustavshchikov Sergey, Maxim Matcin, and Peggy Ferrell.


If you’re a company that needs to scale your engineering capacity quickly, Turing can help you hire from the top 1% of the world’s developers. If you’re a highly-skilled developer that wants to take your career to the next level, you can apply to top remote developer jobs at Turing. With Turing’s talent-cloud, the future of work is boundaryless.

By Dec 17, 2020
Turing News

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition Save the Date: Thursday, October 15th, 11 AM – 2 PM PT   (Join and/or RSVP here) This Thursday, Turing not only introduces you to exciting new product innovations, but also brings together top remote-work experts and advocates in the inaugural Turing Boundaryless Product Event. Over the course of… View Article

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition

Save the Date: Thursday, October 15th, 11 AM – 2 PM PT   (Join and/or RSVP here)

This Thursday, Turing not only introduces you to exciting new product innovations, but also brings together top remote-work experts and advocates in the inaugural Turing Boundaryless Product Event. Over the course of the virtual event, learn how remote-distributed teams can turbo-charge your development, increase your runway, reduce fixed costs, and make your company more attractive to investors. Additionally, the event will allow you to:

  • Hear from scaling experts that have built world-leading products with remote teams. 
  • See the latest product innovations from Turing, the company building AWS for talent. 
  • Learn about the Future of Work with Ting Cai, formerly of Microsoft and now, Senior Director at Google

Please join Turing CEO, Jonathan Siddharth as well as special guests:

Registration and access to the event is free of charge — please RSVP and/or join us here.


Schedule of events:

Turing Product Launch Demo (11am – 11:45am) by Turing CEO and Co-Founder Jonathan Siddharth

Have a first look at Turing’s exciting new product innovations. See how hiring and managing Silicon Valley-caliber engineers can now be faster and easier than ever before.

Panel Discussion: Scaling with Remote Teams (11:45am – 12:25pm)  — by Prakash Gupta with, Dennis Payonk, and Richard Hong

Hear from current customers about their experience building engineering teams on top of Turing. Learn remote work best practices, how to avoid common mistakes, and more.

Fireside Chat with Ting Cai of Google, Ashu Garg of Foundation Capital, and Turing Co-Founder and CEO, Jonathan Siddharth on the Future of Remote Work (12:30pm – 1:30pm)

Join Jonathan Siddharth, Turing’s CEO and Co-Founder, Ashu Garg of Foundation Capital, and Ting Cai, formerly of Microsoft and now, Senior Director at Google, in a lively discussion about the future of work, moderated by TechCrunch reporter, Ingrid Lunden.

Turing Developer Stories — Building Great Products while Changing Lives (1:30pm – 2pm)

See first-hand how Turing changes the course of developers’ lives worldwide while helping customers scale engineering teams quickly, even amid a global pandemic.

Register for free here

Jonathan Siddarth, CEO & Co-Founder, Turing

Prakash Gupta, Founding CRO, Turing

Ting Cai, Senior Director at Google

Ashu Garg, GP, Foundation Capital Ashu Garg, GP, Foundation Capital

Richard Hong, Co-Founder at Pangaea

Dennis Payonk, VP of Engineering at VillageMD

By Oct 12, 2020
Developers Corner

Things to know to get hired as a Turing Engineer

To help you out, we’ve reached out to some Turing engineers who passed Turing’s tests with exceptionally high marks and are now enjoying their time working with Silicon Valley companies. We asked them to share what they think is most important for a software engineer to know or do before applying to Turing.

If you’re reading this, you’re likely a software developer who is considering applying for Turing.com. You might have just learned about Turing a few minutes ago, or you might have already gotten past the teaser coding problem on Turing’s landing page, created a profile, and are now staring at an extensive list of Turing tests. Either way, you (most likely a high-achieving and high-aspiring software developer) are on the right track. The number of high-profile silicon valley companies that hire  remote software developers through Turing  is increasing each week, and more than 160,000 software developers have signed up for Turing in its first year alone. You’re smart to be jumping on this opportunity now! But, if you’re like most developers, some part of you is likely starting to wonder if you’re sufficiently prepared to dive into the application.

Even the most seasoned software developers can get anxious in the days or hours leading up to a technical interview. So, to help you out, we’ve reached out to some Turing engineers who passed Turing’s tests with exceptionally high marks and are now enjoying a remote software job with top US companies. We asked them to share what they think is most important for a software engineer to know or do before applying to Turing. We even asked the primary designer of the Turing Tests himself, Turing’s VP of Engineering, Zan Doan, (previously an Engineering Manager at Facebook) to give his thoughts. Here is what they said:

1) Sharpen your problem-solving skills

First and foremost, as in any silicon valley technical interview process, Turing engineers are expected to be expert problem solvers, able to manipulate data structures and common algorithms to solve a variety of problems while optimizing for speed and efficiency. Everaldo, a Turing engineer based in Curitiba, Brasil, gave the following advice:

 “Turing applicants should familiarize themselves with sites like HackerRank and Codewars, where they can sharpen their problem-solving skills. They should also study dynamic programming and Big O notation to understand techniques for coding challenges, since, if you implement a naive solution, it will get a lower score or might timeout if the solution is quadratic or exponential.”

Everaldo also recommended studying the well-known book “Cracking the Coding Interview” by Gayle McDowell. Not a bad idea considering one can always count on seeing a few Stanford CS students crouched over that “little green CS bible” in the Stanford dining halls during the interview season. Mastering the material there will put you in a position to get the same caliber jobs that many of those same Stanford students are pursuing!

2) Know your tech stacks

One thing that is relatively unique about Turing’s tests is that you have the opportunity to demonstrate mastery in an array of tech stacks with which you’re familiar. Whether you’re a Swift iOS developer, a MongoDB + React + Node.js full-stack developer, a Frontend developer with expertise in Flutter, a Python developer capable of scaling a Django backend, or anything else, you can find corresponding tests on Turing’s platform. Dhyey, a Turing engineer based in Ahmedabad, India, says, “Make sure to take and pass as many tech stack tests as possible. Proving you have a range of skills will make you eligible for multiple roles and increase your chances of getting hired.”

Doing well on these specific tech stack tests might require a little review before you jump into them. Zech, a Turing engineer, based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, recommends you do the following:

 “Take a little time to lightly review anything about that particular technology or language you’re not very familiar with because the tests tend to assess your knowledge about it from end to end. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should dive into a full-on ‘study for exam mode’ but just refresh your knowledge of a few things. If you’ve used a language/technology professionally for some time, you should pass the test without much problem.”

3) Showcase your technical experience

Investing time into filling out all the details of your profile and past experiences may be a hassle, but it will give you an edge over other vetted candidates. Dhyey emphasizes this point saying, “since the process is highly competitive and there is very little human interaction, it is very crucial for your profile to accurately reflect your ability for you to get picked over other vetted candidates.”

If that alone doesn’t convince you of the importance of highlighting your past accomplishments, projects, and experiences, this is the area that Zan Doan, the primary designer of the Turing Tests, also believes is most important. He says: 

“The word I would use to describe the best Turing developers is ‘hands-on.’ Turing jobs often require developers to adapt to a startup environment and make an impact quickly. Because of this, Turing tests not only ask the candidates questions about their general work experience but also hands-on questions about detailed implementations.”

Showcasing your ability to excel in a hands-on environment by taking care to describe your past technical experiences in your profile accurately will prime you for success on Turing.

4) Finally, prepare your workspace for success.

The Turing application process is similar to any technical interview, with the added caveat that the online tests (and later on, the possible interview) are all done remotely, meaning you’re in charge of preparing your space. 

On this point, Zech recommends, “make sure you’re in a relaxed environment with little to no distractions. You’ll need to have a working and stable internet connection, especially since you can’t retake an exam within three months in the event you fail.”

Similarly, if you qualify for an interview, Everaldo says, “it’s just like a regular interview: be ready, on time, dress code, be polite, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also, it helps to have a good setup for the interview. Have a strong Internet connection, headset, mic, and test the setup before the meeting.

And that’s about it! If you feel well-enough prepared in the above four areas, you should have no problem feeling confident clicking “start” to begin taking Turing’s tests or signing into a remote Turing interview. Silicon Valley opportunities are at your doorstep. The most beautiful thing about Turing’s application process is its hyper-focus on finding talent. We believe talent can be found anywhere and can be of all races and genders. And if, by chance, you’re not successful in your first shot at applying to Turing, a computer science education has become so democratized that we’re confident you can study up, come back, and succeed another day.  Remember, at Turing, we know that not only is talent universal, but opportunity as well.

Ready to get started? Apply to Turing’s remote software developer jobs now

By Sep 17, 2020
Turing Announces $14 Million Seed Round
Turing News

Turing Announces $14 Million Seed Round led by Foundation Capital

Company will use the additional capital to accelerate the global shift to remote work Today marks a giant milestone in the history of Turing. The company is delighted to announce its oversubscribed seed round of $14 million. Turing is proud of the support we’ve received from top-tier VCs and prescient investors who share our belief… View Article

Company will use the additional capital to accelerate the global shift to remote work

Today marks a giant milestone in the history of Turing. The company is delighted to announce its oversubscribed seed round of $14 million. Turing is proud of the support we’ve received from top-tier VCs and prescient investors who share our belief that the future of work is boundaryless and that remote-distributed teams democratize opportunity for talented developers wherever they may live.

Investors in Turing’s seed round include Foundation Capital led by Ashu Garg, Adam D’Angelo, Facebook’s first CTO & CEO of Quora, Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, Beerud Sheth, founder of Upwork, Jeff Morris Jr., as well as executives from Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft and Amazon.

According to Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth, “We were already growing fast prior to the coronavirus crisis. I think remote work is here to say. COVID has accelerated a shift that was already underway. We’ve seen a 5-year shift play out in the last 5 months. A lot of companies that want to go remote-first still face key obstacles on sourcing, vetting & managing remote developers. It’s really hard to find silicon valley caliber developers who are remote. It’s hard to evaluate developers who are remote. It can also be frustrating to communicate with remote developers across different timezones. Often the right kind of daily, weekly syncs don’t happen. It’s hard to manage performance. That’s why we built Turing. Turing is creating a new category of verticalized remote work in the cloud. It’s a cloud of developers, that’s sourced by software, vetted by software, matched by software and managed by software. It’s AWS for Talent. What if, you could “push a button” to hire and manage remote developers?” 

The company will use the additional capital to keep scaling the business, investing in continued automation, AI initiatives to source, vet and manage remote developers.

According to Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, “When the Indian outsourcing and IT revolution was in its infancy, I predicted that the market would grow 100X over the next decade. People thought I was crazy at the time and, in retrospect, my prediction seems like a gross underestimation. I feel the same way about Turing. We are creating a new category around remote and distributed work. The future of work is remote, and we’re just getting started.”

Turing’s Founding Story

Turing was founded based upon the idea that talent is universal while opportunities are not. The company’s mission is to find the best developers from all over the world and match them with companies building world-changing products. 

Turing is co-founded by Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishan. The duo discovered the power of using remote teams to build a company during their last venture, Rover, which the two started while still attending Stanford. SaysTuring CTO, Vijay Krishnan, “The cost and challenge of competing with Google, Facebook, Apple, and other giant Silicon Valley companies led us to source highly skilled remote developers from around the world.  What we learned building a company with a fully distributed team convinced us that remote-distributed teams are the future of work.”

Their experience at Rover provided the skills and knowledge that made them the perfect team to launch Turing. Turing’s data science powered platform offers a vertically-integrated solution for companies to spin up engineering teams the same way AWS lets companies instantly add additional server capacity.

Looking towards the Future

Turing will create 1000 jobs for remote engineers by 2022. The goal of the business is to provide Silicon Valley caliber jobs to the top 1% of developers from all over the world, help businesses scale at the push of a button, and level the playing field for the world’s best developers. 

Turing’s founders believe that the future of tech is boundaryless. The company is powering the remote revolution by making it fast, simple, and cost-effective to add exceptional talent to any team, and then to monitor and manage your people no matter where they live.

About Turing:

Turing is an automated platform that lets companies “push a button” to hire and manage remote developers. Turing uses artificial intelligence and data science to source, vet, match, and manage remote developers from all over the world. Turing currently has 160K developers on our platform from almost every country in the world.

Turing’s mission is to help every remote-first tech company build boundaryless teams. Turing’s backers include Foundation Capital, Adam D’Angelo, Facebook’s first CTO & the current CEO of Quora, Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, Jeff Morris, and executives from Google and Facebook. The Information, Entrepreneur, and other major publications have profiled Turing.

About Jonathan Siddharth, Co-Founder, CEO

Jonathan is the CEO  and Co-Founder of Turing.com. Before starting Turing, Jonathan was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Foundation Capital, following the successful sale of his previous AI company, Rover that focused on deep personalization of content recommendations. Jonathan received the best Masters Thesis Award in Computer Science at Stanford University where he specialized in Artificial Intelligence while building AI-enabled products. In his spare time, Jonathan likes helping early-stage entrepreneurs scale companies and tinkering with AI projects.

You can find him Jonathan @jonsidd on Twitter and [email protected] His LinkedIn is https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonsid/.

About Vijay Krishnan, Co-Founder, CTO

Vijay Krishnan is the Co-Founder & CTO of Turing.com. At Turing Vijay leads data science efforts that inform automation in vetting, matching, and managing remote developers. Before co-founding Turing, Vijay was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Foundation Capital following the successful sale of his last AI company, Rover, a business he co-founded while at Stanford. Before Rover, Vijay was a scientist at Yahoo’s Data Mining and Research group. His work led to patented methods to increase Yahoo’s large-scale text categorization accuracy with profound implications for search relevance, ad-matching, user, and content personalization efforts.  

Vijay has a master’s degree in computer science from Stanford University, specializing in AI. Vijay is recently married and lives in Palo Alto, California. You can find Vijay on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Media Contact  —   Oliver Starr, Head of Content    —   [email protected]    — 530-641-3999

By Sep 2, 2020
COVID-19

The Post-COVID-19 Workplace

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Pressed suits and business trips have given way to Zoom calls made from the kitchen counter, and growing collections of drawstring pants. With more and more companies making increasingly long-term shifts to remote work, it leaves us wondering, what will the new ‘normal’ workplace entail?

Earlier this month, the BBC Visual and Data Journalism Team released a stunning rendition of a typical work day in the post-COVID-19 workplace. While many of their proposed changes to the workplace will come as obvious adaptations, some of their predictions may surprise you.

Architecture

The demand for large-scale office spaces is already dwindling, according to Hugh Pearman of the Royal Institute of British Architects. In their place, Pearman argues, will rise specially designed workplaces removed from bustling city centers.

Such workplaces will be smaller, and carefully designed to facilitate in-person meetings; which will likely only be held for collaboration and brainstorming with colleagues. Long-gone are the full work days of tapping away at a keyboard (you can do that from home).

“Touchless Technologies”

Additionally, new buildings will likely employ “touchless technologies” that take advantage of data science, face activation, and voice recognition. Furthermore, air conditioning may be equipped with UV lights to kill bacteria and viruses. Antimicrobial metals such as copper will be used in high-touch areas.

“The Shift Away from the City”

Pearman goes on to point to historical precedents of health concerns driving large scale infrastructure changes. It was concern of disease and air pollution in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that triggered population movements away from city centers into new and growing suburban areas.

“The Death of the City”, as a recent Politico article called it, blames COVID-19-induced telecommuting as the root cause of the urban flight taking place across the developed world. When employees realize they can work from anywhere, the lucky ones pick up and move for greener pastures.

“Making the Home Work”

With more people completing a greater portion of their jobs from home, the very idea of “home” is bound to shift as well. UK architect Grace Choi has already experienced these new demands, with more and more requests being made to incorporate home offices and work studios into new constructions.

According to Choi, “we’re all going to need to configure our space in a more intelligent way” as we adjust to a world of remote work structures.

We will all be adjusting in the months (and years) to come as we become hybrid workers – sometimes at home, sometimes at the office. One thing’s for sure however, remote work is here to stay.

By Aug 17, 2020
How to Encourage Remote Teams to Learn New Skills
Turing News

How to Encourage Remote Teams to Learn New Skills

Assembling a remote workforce is just the beginning, though, as you’ll need to onboard everyone, manage teams, and get them working productively. Once you do this, you then have to tackle the challenge of keeping your workforce engaged by encouraging them to learn new skills. Leveling-up is an often overlooked aspect of remote work management.

Remote work will be part of the new normal, especially with job search engine Adzuna noting a 270% increase in remote job offerings since 2017. Employers today — led by Adobe and Aetna — are tapping into a vast talent pool unrestricted by geography, with various industries looking to fill vacancies. Assembling a remote workforce is just the beginning, though, as you’ll need to onboard everyone, manage teams, and get them working productively. Once you do this, you then have to tackle the challenge of keeping your workforce engaged by encouraging them to learn new skills. Leveling-up is an often overlooked aspect of remote work management.

 Why encourage them in the first place?

We discussed in ’10 Traits of the Best Remote Managers’ how good remote workforce managers support their team members’ career development, as failure to do so can make them feel neglected. After all, continuous learning is crucial, with CNBC describing how acquiring new skills is becoming more valued than degrees and similar credentials in the modern workforce. That’s especially true given the rapid changes in technology — changes that make some 40–50% of employees feel under-equipped to do their jobs well. So, at the very least, ensuring your team has the means to learn new skills will help them perform better in their current position.

 Encourage your team through using the right software 

To help your team learn new skills while working remotely, you need to ensure that you have the right software. The good news is that software like Loom and TalentLMS is designed for educating remotely.

 Loom

Many distance learning tools have emerged in recent years, and Loom is considered an industry leader due to its ability to share content. An outline of Loom’s features by HP details how the app allows those running the lessons to record videos and share tutorials. Loom will enable you to quickly get detailed lessons and instructions to your remote team no matter where they are. Even better, Loom lets you see who has watched your videos, giving you a mechanism to monitor whether or not your team is taking advantage of the opportunities you are providing. In this way, you’ll be able to identify who among your team is genuinely engaged in learning — allowing you to give more encouragement to those who aren’t.

TalentLMS

While Loom is for general distance learning, TalentLMS is tailored for businesses. A review of TalentLMS’s features by Finances Online notes how the platform can help users simplify conducting activities like webinars, online courses, and training programs. You can even build eLearning courses and save them on a cloud server, where your team can access them at their convenience. Having the classes in the cloud will give your team the flexibility to learn in their own time and on their terms. 

Encourage your team to be proactive learners

 While encouraging your team to learn new skills is necessary, if you want to have a productive workforce, you also have to encourage them to be proactive in wanting to learn. Forbes recommends leveraging existing resources for upskilling, such as asking skilled team members to create eLearning courses and provide guided instruction. By having team members create resources and teach others, every level of the company will be learning, whether it is team management or a new skill essential for the workforce.

 It is vital to make sure that there’s a plan to help build your remote employees’ skillset. And it is your job to encourage them and provide an environment where that rewards learning. We hope this article helps. 

For more on hiring high quality remote engineers for your startup, be sure to check out Turing where you can push a button to hire Silicon Valley quality talent at scale, on demand.

AUTHOR BIO: Maggie Myers is part of a multinational consulting firm offering human resources and talent acquisition consulting. She has extensive experience doing remote work and is currently managing a small remote team of content creators.

By Jun 11, 2020
COVID-19

Helping Amazing Engineers Get Back to Work Quickly

Please enjoy this replay of Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth, as he speaks to the shockwaves rippling through the technology community as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Helping Companies and Engineers During this Crisis

Please enjoy this replay of Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth, as he speaks to the shockwaves rippling through the technology community as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Says Jonathan; “We are living in unprecedented times. A lot of people are about to be negatively impacted by all the changes in our economy. I’m sure you’ve already heard of layoffs at many companies or companies planning to do layoffs.”

“Unfortunately, our country and the world are going to go through a very painful rebuilding process. Many companies that were not fundamentally as strong are going to go through layoffs where amazing, talented developers are going to be let go.”

“We think information workers, knowledge workers, and software engineers are likely to be disproportionately impacted in the US, and many other places.”

“We want to do our part too. Turing has always been committed to finding the world’s best developer talent, through our automated vetting engine and matching them with the world’s best companies.”

To hear the rest of Jonathan’s thoughts and how Turing can help, watch the full Periscope above.

By Apr 6, 2020
COVID-19

A Collection of the Best Guides for the Suddenly Remote in the Time of COVID-19

At Turing, we’ve been focused on remote work for years. To help you out during the COVID-19 crisis, we’ve begun curating the best and most in-depth guides to help you navigate this new and confusing reality.

With so much information out there right now for the Suddenly-Remote, it can be hard to know where to turn or which information is reliable.

At Turing, we’ve been focused on remote work for years. To help you out during the COVID-19 crisis, we’ve begun curating the best and most in-depth guides to help you navigate this new and confusing reality.

We will continue to add to and update this list as additional high-quality information becomes available. Keep in mind that the majority of these guides were written for the immediate application of remote-work basics. They are not intended to provide the detailed information, skills, and best practices required for sustainable remote work or for new companies that are adopting a remote-first paradigm from day one.

With that in mind, here are our initial picks for the best guides to help you and your company deal with the need to go Suddenly-Remote during this very challenging moment in time.

GitLab’s Guide To Remote Work

https://about.gitlab.com/company/culture/all-remote/

Gitlab is the world’s largest all-remote team. They know what they are talking about. Gitlab’s guide is one of the most detailed guides out there and includes the company’s “Remote Manifesto.” They cover:

● How & Why

● Getting Started

● People & Values

● Management

● Hiring & Learning

You can jump into the sections that are most relevant to you and your team and share the link with others throughout your organization to help get them up to speed on all things remote.

Zapier’s guide to working remotely

https://zapier.com/learn/remote-work/

Here is another remote working heavy hitter. Zapier is 100% distributed, with over 300 employees spread across 17 countries.

The Zapier guide includes an AMA for those new to remote, which is available at the start of the page. This guide consists of the following seven areas:

  1. Automation for remote work
  2. Teamwork on a remote team 
  3. Remote work for managers 
  4. Remote work for employees 
  5. Remote workspaces 
  6. Remote work tools The state of remote work

Zapier has also added a recommended reading list. Their guide is downloadable as a file for ease of sharing.

Remote Work Guides from Twist

https://twist.com/remote-work-guides

Twist is a communication app from the wonderful people at Doist. Doist is a remote company with 68 team members spread across 25 countries.

Their guide is a collection of various remote working guides curated in once place. The guides available are as follows:

● The Future of Work: The Guide to Remote Work

● Remote Setup: The Remote Guide to Logistics

● Remote Projects 101: The Remote Guide to Project Management

● Scaling Your Remote Team: The Remote Guide to Hiring

● Leading Distributed: The Remote Guide to Management

● The Art of Async: The Remote Guide to Team Communication

● Designing Without Whiteboards: The Remote Guide to Product Design

There is a great depth of information here, including thoughts from various remote work experts throughout the guide.

The ultimate guide to remote work from Miro

https://miro.com/guides/remote-work/

Miro believes in helping teams to collaborate. Their remote work guide covers:

● Introduction to Remote Work & Collaboration

● Is Remote Work as Great as it Sounds?

● The Most Important Remote Work Statistics

● Guide to Hiring Remote Employees

● How to Onboard Remote Employees

● Building Remote Work Culture & Why It’s So Important

● How to Manage a Remote Team

● Engage Your Remote Team to Keep Productivity High

● Complete Guide to Remote Team Meetings

● 15 Best Team Building Activities & Games for Remote Workers

But what if you need more than a guide? The extraordinary team at Slack has you covered there, too. Simply click this link: https://calendly.com/slack-customer-experience/remote-consult?month=2020-03 to schedule a remote team consultation.

As more quality information is released, we’ll be updating this meta-guide to help you easily find the best resources from one centralized location.

By Mar 19, 2020
COVID-19

Remote Now! A Quick Guide to Remote Work Best Practices

In a world where so many are going suddenly remote there are things we can learn from those who have been working outside a traditional office. While there are differences in circumstances, job types and personalities, there are also many commonalities for those of us working remotely.   Here is an outline of some best practices to help you, and your team, make the most of remote work. 

Note: This is the second part in our series on Remote Now, a primer for employees and companies that have been forced to become suddenly remote due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Stay tuned for additional posts over the next few days!

In a world where so many are going suddenly remote there are things we can learn from those who have been working outside a traditional office.

While there are differences in circumstances, job types and personalities, there are also many commonalities for those of us working remotely.  

Here is an outline of some best practices to help you, and your team, make the most of remote work. 

We will cover:

  • Communication
  • Social interactions
  • Trust
  • Online etiquette
  • Remote work boundaries

Over Communication is Key

Quick Wins:

  • Have agreed communication processes & schedules
  • Embrace the remote way of communicating
  • Use video in meetings
  • Batch communications where appropriate
  • Edit and review messages before you send them
  • Over communicate = assume nothing – give context and give some more
  • Strong documentation as a rule 

This is the number one challenge for most people going remote.  When working in an office we become accustomed to being able to “swing by” someone’s desk to ask a question.  Communication in a remote role forces us to be more deliberate and think ahead of time what we might need when we send a message to a colleague.

It also forces us to not “scratch the itch” straight away.  You might like an answer from your colleague straight away, but if you are using asynchronous communication then you need to get comfortable with waiting for a response.  But having agreed times that people respond by will help the team to know, and meet, expectation.

And batching communications will help you develop better communications hygiene.  Don’t send off a message every time you have a query, put them into one post and edit and review before sending.  Ask if you could make your message clearer, or do you need this level of information?

Documentation is a huge part of keeping your team and projects moving forward.  Make sure to prioritize good documentation and agree on formats and processes for keeping documents up to date, while ensuring version protection and data security.



Quick definition: Synchronous = real time e.g. phone or video call  vs. Asynchronous Communication = you send the information not expecting it to be picked up straight away e.g. email, messages via Slack.

Social Beings and Trust

Quick Wins:

  • Schedule social time with the team
  • Have the trust talk with team members
  • Set expectations around check-ins
  • Encourage two sided feedback
  • Ensure team members feel supported
  • Build serendipity into the team

We are social creatures which helps us to create bonds, growing trust and improving communication and collaboration as trust is developed.  Without social interactions this can be greatly slowed down on a remote team. Build some serendipity into how the team interacts, using tools like Donut via Slack helps to bring some randomness into team interactions and encourage the creativity and the social strengthening that happens in unstructured situations.

Therefore making social interactions part of your work week is hugely important.  Make time in your daily standup to include time to chat about life in general, while it might feel like a “waste of time” there and then, it is actuallys an investment in improving the team’s effectiveness in the long run.

Schedule in virtual chats, run ice-breakers and when appropriate, organise in person meetups to help your team to bond.

Managers should start open conversations with team members to ensure they feel trusted within their work.  As a manager you may need to “check-in” on a team member, but make sure it’s clear that you’re not “checking up on them”, this can feel like unnecessary monitoring.  Build clear expectations around when check-ins happen at the team and individual level. Schedule them in, use a format like a daily stand-up to help everyone know where they are on a project, what their next steps are and how they are progressing so far.  For individual check-in, ensure that team members know that these are about finding out if they are enjoying their work and feel supported. Make it about you both sharing information and have equal sharing of feedback.

Key to all of this is trust, it can be hard to help people new to remote work to feel like they are trusted.  This is vital in helping that person to flourish in a remote role and should be a core part of the management team’s goals.  Having the conversation about trust helps, also recognising someone when their work is good is very important.

Online Etiquette and Boundaries

Quick Wins:

  • Use video for conference calls
  • Use an agenda
  • Everyone is remote for the meeting
  • Either set specific “office hours” or a set cut off point for work
  • Create rituals to help you start and end the day

Because of the nature of many of the tools we are using we need to be extra deliberate about how we an online meeting.  It is much easier to mistakenly speak over someone in a video conference call than in a physical meeting room. Create habits that help to ensure people are engaged and feel involved.

If you have a hybrid team and are running a conference call, treat everyone as if they are remote.  Having some team members in a room, while your remote colleagues are struggling to hear the conversation happening on site isn’t good meeting etiquette.  Have all team members at their desks and dialling in as if they are also remote. This helps to level the field for communication and gives the in office team members a clearer understanding of what is good practice for an online meeting.

And finally boundaries.  These are important to ensure people don’t burn out.  A struggle for many remote workers is continuing to work late into the evening, or working through lunch.  This becomes a matter of diminishing returns, you are no longer as effective and it can take days to come back from burnout.  Agree a set hours of work where possible, and suitable, or set yourself certain boundaries like “I don’t work after 8pm on a week day” will help to avoid burn out.  It also helps you not needing to wonder if you are ok, or if you could fit in another hour, which is one more decision you would need to make. 

The issue is often being able to switch off after a days work.  You might have just hit on an amazing idea but now it’s “home time”, using rituals to finish (and start) your day helps you to get into the right mindset and wind down from your work brain.  Things like taking a walk outside, listening to a certain type of music, exercise or scheduling a call or coffee with a friend or family member can help to draw the lines around your work.

We all find our own ways of working and are always learning from each other.  We’d love to hear what works well for you and your team. Find us on Twitter and let us know your remote working best practices!

By Mar 16, 2020
COVID-19

Remote Now! A primer for the “suddenly remote” during the COVID-19 pandemic

By now, you’ve almost certainly heard the news. As coronavirus cases explode around the globe, more and more companies are instructing their teams to work from home. For companies that already have a fully or partially remote structure, this is pretty much business as usual. But, if your employer is more traditional, being forced to run an entire business with a team that finds itself in the position of suddenly being remote presents a slew of challenges.

Introduction:

By now, you’ve almost certainly heard the news. As coronavirus cases explode around the globe, more and more companies are instructing their teams to work from home.

For companies that already have a fully or partially remote structure, this is pretty much business as usual. But, if your employer is more traditional, being forced to run an entire business with a team that finds itself in the position of suddenly being remote presents a slew of challenges.

This primer, which will be produced in short excerpts, is intended to help employees and employers get a grip on the essential skills, tools, and best practices that will reduce the problems and stress we’re all likely to encounter during this frightening time.

For most of us, this Remote-Now experience will (hopefully) be short-lived. If we’re fortunate, we’ll weather the coronavirus crisis quickly, and within a couple of weeks, people will be able to return to their offices and normal work schedules.

This primer is not intended to help your company “go remote” on a long term basis. Our goal is to give you the necessary knowledge and skills to enable you to continue your operations with as little disruption as possible during the near term.

As a result, we’re not going to do an exhaustive review of every tool, or of all the techniques that remote-first companies use. Instead, we’ll focus on simple practices and widely available and mostly free tools that will allow you to get started quickly and function at a reasonably high level during this difficult time.

Over the next several short posts, we’ll profile the tools we think are the easiest to learn, the most common (making it more likely your team is already familiar with them), and especially those that are inexpensive or free. We’ll talk about scheduling, give you a list of the most common remote worker shorthand, and go over the best practices we’ve found that will help your team interact in the most seamless manner possible.

To help you get started, here’s a short list courtesy of Lisette Sutherland of Collaboration Superpowers with the simple things your company and employees can do now to help make this daunting and unexpected challenge a bit easier:

  1. Find a dedicated place in your house. Make this an area where you can be productive and is separate from your private life. 
  2. Use video. It’s important that your team members can see and hear you well. Have plenty of light and wear a headset.
  3. Create a team agreement. Talk about expectations for how to work together—templates available here.
  4. Set goals and be enthusiastic. Working remote is all about trust and communication. How will you know what each other are doing? 
  5. Get familiar with the tools. There are great tools available for online collaboration like ZoomSlack, and GoogleDocs that can make this process easier.
  6. Lean in. Start without big expectations, experiment, and grow your skills. Put feedback loops in place to evaluate progress. Regular retrospectives on how the team is doing will inspire continuous improvement and trust.

In addition, don’t forget to be empathetic. Not everyone has worked from home before. Some issues and distractions are likely to make this effort more challenging for some than others (kids home from school or a sick spouse come to mind). 

There’s a learning curve here. Going Remote on the fly is not the simplest thing in the world, especially when that world is freaking out around you. Put simply, be kind to one another. We’re all in this together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Mar 13, 2020
Boundaryless Landscape

Six Remote-Work Myths That Need to Die in 2020

The problem with today’s remote-work myths is that they cause needless apprehension that prevents companies from being competitive. These myths also prevent hundreds of thousands of employees worldwide from being as productive and fulfilled as they could be. In this post we expose the myths that might hold companies back from becoming bigger, better, and boundaryless.

Forbes recently published an article titled 10 Potential Developments for Businesses When Adopting Remote Working Arrangements. It featured ten members of the Forbes Finance Council.

Although the article was insightful in some sections, I found that it ultimately spread more myths than facts.

The problem with today’s remote-work myths is that they cause needless apprehension that prevents companies from being competitive. These myths also prevent hundreds of thousands of employees worldwide from being as productive and fulfilled as they could be.

The first six points in the Forbes article were mostly accurate. Remote work creates:

  • More Accessibility and Flexibility
  • Lower Labor Costs
  • Reduced Space Needs
  • Improved Employee Longevity
  • Reduced Scaling Costs
  • Increased Effectiveness While Capturing Top Talent

But the article’s last four points are where the myths emerged.

Myth 1: Remote Work Creates “A Need for Sophisticated IT Solutions.”

Turing's Boundaryless Landscape of Remote Distributed Products

Turing’s Boundaryless Landscape of Remote Distributed Products

According to the article, remote work “requires sophisticated IT solutions to execute properly and ensure work continues seamlessly at work or at home.” What the article doesn’t mention is that an entire landscape of apps exists for ensuring that work continues seamlessly.

While these apps are certainly sophisticated, IT departments aren’t needed to use them.

Myth 2: Remote Work Leads to “Fluctuating Productivity Levels”

According to one of the article’s contributors, “it can be challenging to help your remote employees to either maintain or improve their productivity levels when required.”

The reality is that remote workers are generally more productive than office employees, and we’ve known this for quite some time. See, for example, this study from 2015, this one from 2018, and this one from 2019.

Myth 3: Remote Work Creates “Communication Issues Leading to Bigger Costs”

According to one of the contributors of the article:

Communication is at the root of most problems, so a resource strategy that makes communication less direct will be challenged. What is lost is synergy, collaboration, accountability and more that benefit most from face-to-face experiences. What is gained are inefficiencies and, therefore, costs.

There are several misconceptions there. In reality, the robust landscape  of communication tools makes it possible for remote professionals to collaborate as effectively (or even more effectively) than office employees.

Face-to-face communication has diminished in the office. On-site employees are already accustomed to emailing their colleagues or touching base via Slack. Since office employees are already using these apps to collaborate with co-workers down the hall or a couple cubicles away, they might as well be working remotely. There’s no difference.

Further, when office employees do come together for in-person meetings, the chief complaint is, “I could’ve saved an hour of my workday by getting a Slack message instead.”

So, contrary to the claims of the article, remote work does not lead to communication issues, inefficiencies, or greater costs. In fact, remote work boosts communication and efficiencies, thereby reducing costs.

Myth 4: Remote Work Creates “Negative Energy”

No other myth makes me scratch my head as much as this one – especially when the same Forbes article, in the “Improved Employee Longevity” paragraph, contradicts this negative-energy paragraph. (Earlier in the article, one of the contributors correctly writes, “Letting your employees work one regular day from home can do wonders for morale.”)

Here’s the “negative-energy” blurb, quoted from the last paragraph of the Forbes article:

The culture of a team and an office is becoming very important, and not having the team all in one place can create negative energy.

Wrong.

As studies like this one have demonstrated, “Among other findings, we learned that remote work or the ability to work remotely makes employees happier, feel more trusted, better able to achieve work-life balance, and more inclined to take a pay cut to benefit from added flexibility.”

Myth 5: An Office Is Needed for a Healthy Corporate Culture

The culture of a team and an office is becoming very important…

While a healthy team culture is indeed very important, it’s certainly not true that an office is necessary for this. In fact, two-thirds of knowledge workers think the office will disappear by 2030.

The reality is that the landscape of communication tools makes a robust team culture possible with no central headquarters. Remote teams collaborate without the necessary evils that accompany life in an office – including gossip, corporate politics, micromanaging, and other negatives that suffocate a good team culture.

Myth 6: Remote Workers Don’t “Work”

Again focusing on the last paragraph of the Forbes article:

We see more and more employees who want to “work” from home. I believe that less work is being done, and other employees see them as not being team players. Things come up during the day, and when things go sideways that is when employees can bond the best.

It’s staggering that there are still executives who view remote workers as delinquent slackards who spend their workdays watching YouTube or playing Fortnite while getting paid.

Obviously, this is nonsense. As with any other job situation, not working will quickly lead to getting fired.

Again, refer to the studies I mentioned above in Myth 2. Remote workers are generally more productive than office employees.

Further, contrary to the above quote, on-site employees certainly view their remote counterpart as “team players.” If a weakest link is pinpointed, remote workers know that they can be replaced just as easily as office employees. There’s as much incentive for remote workers to pull their own weight as there is with office employees.

In the 2020s, Companies Who Don’t Offer Remote Work Options will Lose

According to Buffer’s State of Remote Work Report, 99 percent of their survey respondents want to work remotely at least some of the time for the rest of their careers.

If you want to keep your best employees, boost productivity, and gain the ability to hire world-class talent from around the globe, don’t listen to the remote-work naysayers. In the 2020s, remote-friendly companies will be the most competitive.

By Jan 8, 2020
Woman staring at laptop screen
Turing News

How to Run Meetings with Remote Employees

Advancements in technology have made the world a much smaller place, leading firms to create more global offices, remote teams, and therefore, hold more remote meetings. If you’re a manager, I’m sure you’ve had to schedule and operate some variation of a remote meeting at some point. If you have, I’m even more sure that… View Article

Advancements in technology have made the world a much smaller place, leading firms to create more global offices, remote teams, and therefore, hold more remote meetings.

If you’re a manager, I’m sure you’ve had to schedule and operate some variation of a remote meeting at some point. If you have, I’m even more sure that you’re aware of the challenges this process entails, such as disengaged workers, long run times, unclear communication, and so on.

If done effectively, however, remote meetings can be productive and efficient. Here are a few ways to run smooth and well-organized meetings with remote teams:

1. Don’t include everyone.

The number one reason why workers feel disengaged during remote meetings is simply because their presence is not required at the meeting. Instead of involving every employee at every meeting, it is important to identify which of your employees are essential and which are non-essential for each meeting. Time is the most precious commodity in the business world and by involving workers in a meeting who have no real reason to be there, you’re just wasting your and your workers’ time– time that they could spend getting important things done and being productive.

2. Create a collaborative agenda.

This should go for any meeting, but it is especially important to have an agenda for your remote meetings. Make sure that this agenda is known to your workers and that you get them to contribute to it. An agenda will help keep the discussion on track, while also giving your employees a voice.

3. Have local employees engage remotely in meetings, along with their remote co-workers.

This may seem like a pretty radical idea, but hear me out: if you work in a hybrid (part local and part remote) office, having your non-remote workers engage in the meeting from their desktops can be a great way to level the playing field, so to speak.

Remote workers often feel as though their voices go unheard; however, if everyone (irrespective of location) dials in from their respective devices, you’ll end up having a far more equal meeting where everyone feels important and essential. This will lead them to be more engaged during the meeting. This method works logistically and can prove to be far more time-effective as well.

4. Utilize tools to improve communication.

Using screen-sharing tools and online chat interfaces like Skype, you can replicate a real-life interaction to as close a degree as possible. I’m sure you’re aware of the more popular tools for these jobs, but here are a few lesser-known but equally (if not more) effective software:

  •       Join.me: fast video chatting with screen-sharing
  •       Zoom.us: meetings, webinars for over 100 employees at a time
  •       Appear.in: permanent video chat-room where people can join in/out anytime

5. Make sure that your remote employees are fairly represented in meetings, despite not physically being there.

Elect a representative for your remote teams to voice their opinions and concerns. This helps some of the more reserved workers to open up and voice their feelings without scrutiny. Having just one speaker per team can also help save time in meetings. Additionally, a remote representative can also help bypass issues that may come with remote workers not being fluent in your language. For example, if your remote team operates out of China and a lot of them aren’t fluent in English, it can be more comfortable and easier for them to report their concerns to an English speaking, Chinese representative who can then carry their opinions to you.

Conducting a productive meeting with remote employees may seem like a fool’s errand to some, however, with a few simple steps, you can make remote meetings just as successful as your local ones.

By Feb 28, 2019
Working from home on a laptop
Turing News

Overcoming Objections to Using Remote Teams

So, you’ve just proposed bringing on freelance workers at your company. While the numerous benefits seem obvious to you, you are instantly inundated with a barrage of questions. Fear not, we’ve all been there. Although freelancing/ remote working is a very popular trend in the business world, hiring them is still considered a radical idea…. View Article

So, you’ve just proposed bringing on freelance workers at your company. While the numerous benefits seem obvious to you, you are instantly inundated with a barrage of questions. Fear not, we’ve all been there. Although freelancing/ remote working is a very popular trend in the business world, hiring them is still considered a radical idea.

Here are a few common objections we hear and ways that you can overcome them:

1. “Will They Be Up to The Task?”

The essence of this question is quality, and it’s a legitimate concern. However, there are a few ways to ensure that you’re hiring top remote workers.

First, if possible, try to exclusively hire pre-vetted freelancers. Platforms, like Turing, provide companies access to hundreds of freelancers/ remote workers, from all over the world that are already screened, interviewed and tested.

If it is not possible to do so, then screen and test remote candidates yourself, during the interview process. It’s all about the deliverables, so give them a take home project that is typical of the work you would be assigning them, should they get the job. Once hired, start them off with smaller tasks that you can sign off on—this will allow you to spot any discrepancies in their work early on.

2. “How Will We Manage Them?”

A large part of finding the right freelancer is finding someone who works well with your management style. This involves as much introspection, as it does an outward search for the right candidate. First, know what kind of a manager you are and commence your search based on those conclusions.

Whenever possible, try to hire freelancers/ remote workers, who will keep the same (or a similar) schedule as you. Also, make sure to use clearly defined, time-sensitive OKRs, as this is a general management principle, really but is applicable in freelance structures as well.

3. “And What About Communication?”

It is a very popular concern that communication, in regards to freelance/ remote workers, across various geographic and cultural borders, is not practical. However, in the digital age, this really shouldn’t be a point of contention. Given the amount of technology available at your disposal, it is actually the best time to invest in freelance workers.

Learn more about effectively facilitating communication among remote and freelance teams, here.

4. “But, But, But—Cultural Differences!”

We hear this one A LOT, but here’s the thing: having workers from different cultures and nationalities isn’t a bad thing. In fact, it’s a great thing! By having a more culturally diverse and inclusive team, you’re doing your PR a world of good- in addition to boosting your team’s overall creativity and efficiency. Yes, you read that correctly. Teams that are culturally diverse are more likely to come up with creative breakthroughs and insight.

While the concept of hiring global, remote employees may seem like a precarious business decision, it is only a fact that this is the way of the future. With so much technology and global talent at our fingertips, it seems silly not to give hiring remotely a chance.

For pre-vetted global, remote workers, check out Turing’s website. We place the top 1% of job candidates with companies in need of their services. Our remote workers go through a series of background checks, interviews, and tests, before we place them with an assignment, assuring you that you only receive the best of the best in terms of talent, personality, and reliability.

By Feb 14, 2019