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zinnov confluence 2021
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Turing CEO, Jonathan Siddharth, Discusses Employee Experience in the Hybrid Workplace at Zinnov Confluence 2021

Jonathan joined expert panelists to discuss the rise of remote work, strategies and challenges of hiring remote workers, and the need for organizational transparency.

Jonathan joined expert panelists to discuss the rise of remote work, strategies and challenges of hiring remote workers, and the need for organizational transparency.

Jonathan Siddharth, CEO, and co-founder of Turing, joined a panel of executive leaders for Zinnov Confluence, Nurturing Phoenixes: Reimagining Employee Experience in the Hybrid Workplace on March 25th, 2021. The entirely virtual edition of Confluence 2021 – US Chapter highlighted how leaders should adapt to disruptions shaped by technology and talent in the post-pandemic new normal.

Delving into the intricacies of employee engagement and mental well-being, sustaining a positive mindset, and providing timely assistance, the session showcased how organizations rose above the challenges posed by the pandemic and embraced remote and hybrid work environments.

Along with Jonathan,  panelists included Vijay Shah, CEO, and President of V2Solutions; Richa Gupta, Chief People Officer at Castlight Health; Vibha Misra, Vice President and Head of HR  for SAP Silicon Valley; and Vamsee Tirukkala, Chief Commercial Officer and Co-founder of Draup (Session Chair). 

zinnov confluence 2021

Here are some of the key takeaways from the panel:

The Future of Work is Remote

“The big shift,” Jonathan says, “is going forward, all work will be remote work and all teams will be distributed — even globally distributed — teams. In the new normal, a tremendous amount of work is going to be remote or remote-hybrid.” Jonathan continued, “In the future, the three things that people will have to keep in mind are:

  1. Mastering  asynchronous communication 
  2. Enforcing consistency in how teams communicate
  3. Having a great culture

“These are three things to double down on in this new normal,” Jonathan added.  

Trends in Employee Management and Engagement

Vibha shared that SAP’s priorities as an organization were employee safety and well-being. Addressing the challenges that her team faced while going remote, she recounted: “One of the challenges for us was community building. With community building, we started going virtual and encouraged people to come together and form teams (to perform various activities together).” 

Talking about the unique trends he had observed in terms of employee engagement, Vijay outlined: “(The past year) has been an opportunity for new players to shine in a new light. Discoveries that we would’ve never made have been expedited. Passive individuals have become remarkable leaders.” He further elaborated that as an organization, his company gave precedence to staying calm and not adding to anxiety people were already feeling. 

The Need for Organizational Transparency 

Vijay stated that the FSAT score i.e. the Family Satisfaction score helped V2Solutions in gauging the overall productivity of the team and measuring their anxiety levels. “We ran a survey where the employees didn’t have a say but the family members had a say on how the employees were doing,” he explained. 

Adding to the discourse on maintaining organizational transparency, Jonathan said: “When you’re operating as a remote distributed team, the most important thing is asynchronous communication. At Turing, we have a very detailed onboarding process where we ensure that the person understands the organizational context, the different teams that work together along with the metrics they care about, and the company’s priorities quarter by quarter. We write all of this down and share it with people because we don’t want people to be stuck in Slack silos, where they don’t know what’s happening in other channels.”

Jonathan also accentuated the importance of setting up frequent checkpoints and periodic follow-throughs to maintain transparency, where possible. “I encourage my teams to have in-person meetings where it’s safe to do so. Remote work does not mean you never meet and are always in Zoom. Some of our teams occasionally have socially distanced meetings, if they’re comfortable doing so,” he elaborated. 

Trust and Wise Compassion 

Further, into the session, the speakers shared views on the best practices that companies should adopt when working remotely. “Communication is key for any successful change management. It’s important to communicate truthfully with the employees and set the right expectations,” observed Vibha. She also underscored the importance of defining organizational behaviors, conducting employee trust surveys, and giving back to society to nurture organizational culture. 

Adding to this theme, Richa noted: “The one concept that I have learned and taught my managers (at Castlight Health) is the concept of wise compassion. The economy went through some complex changes and we don’t have a day to skip a beat. We have to keep the work going, and we have to keep the people going. Getting tough things done in a humane way is wise compassion.” She stated that connecting people digitally on common causes was imperative for ensuring healthy communication between teams and individuals. 

Hiring remote – Strategies and Challenges  

The panelists also discussed principal factors to keep in mind while hiring remote talent. Drawing attention to employers’ proclivity to hire the best in the world, Jonathan shared: “If you’re hiring in a remote-first world it is important to look into countries that have high-quality talent but not enough local opportunity. There is great talent all over the world, you just need to have a data-driven process that can evaluate a really large top of the funnel.” 

On the challenges of remote hiring, he stated: “If you’re hiring a great engineer from Sao Paulo, Brazil, you may not see Stanford or Berkeley on their resume. You won’t see Google or Facebook in their work experience. But these may still be great people. Since you cannot filter by resume or LinkedIn profile, you have to assess through light-weight technical tests for screening, which creates a level playing field.” 

Jonathan also spoke about the significance of conducting asynchronous tests while evaluating remote candidates. “We find testing to be very fair in terms of elimination of bias. We don’t care what the people look like or sound like, we just care whether they can do the job,” he asserted. 

The session left the audience with notable insight on evolving employee experience amidst the pandemic and concluded with an optimistic outlook for a remote-friendly future. 

Watch the entire session here



By Apr 22, 2021
Turing Events

Turing Leaders Explain How They Built the World’s Most-Advanced Vetting and Matching System

Turing’s Vijay Krishnan, Zan Doan, Chul Kwon, and Alex Sung explain the science behind the world’s most-advanced vetting and matching system .

The fourth and final session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference saw an all-Turing exec team explaining how they built the world’s most-advanced vetting and matching system to match developers from across the globe with top Silicon Valley opportunities.

The speakers for this session included Turing.com co-founder and CTO Vijay Krishnan, VP of engineering Zan Doan, senior growth product manager Chul Kwon, and senior product manager Alex Sung.

Describing the reason behind the consistent increase in the number of customers demanding Turing developers, Vijay said: “The reasons are threefold—intelligent vetting, speed of hiring, and scalable quality control.”

The panelists also shed light on several other innovative Turing products generating significant value for both companies and developers.

Zan told the audience how Turing uses the lessons from Facebook, Google, Uber, and other top engineering organizations to produce an intelligent vetting engine. 

He said: “At Turing, we cover all important vetting areas that help us to vet great engineers.” 

“We created more than 100 automated assessments that not only cover the vetting standards followed in the Bay Area but also assess other critical aspects of an engineer,” Zan added.

Zan also explained how Turing’s intelligent management system addresses the three main concerns relating to remote work—communication, performance, and management.

He said: “For communication, we have daily standups, bi-weekly 1-on-1s and time zone overlap; for performance and productivity tracker, we have performance reviews, Turing virtual machines; and for ease of management, we have payments, contracts, and billing security.”

During his demo, Chul helped the audience understand how Turing’s automated seniority assessment test, algorithm coding interview, and automated vetting flows help companies hire top engineers in days rather than weeks. 

“By leveraging data science, we have reduced vetting time to just six hours. Radically reduced vetting time means you can have the world’s best engineers, not in sixty days but less than a week. The purpose of Turing is to help you get your dream engineers on-demand,” Chul said.

Next, Alex decoded Turing’s deep developer profile with a crisp and clear presentation. “Turing developer profiles are detailed, comprehensive, continuously updating, representations of our developers. They only show validated skills, and on-the-job performance data enrich them,” he said.

Alex also spoke about the Turing Workspace and the Turing Virtual Machine’s importance in managing remote talent efficiently and keeping firms’ code safe, respectively.

In the end, Vijay explained the data science and machine learning efforts at Turing and how they helped the company in building deep developer profiles, powering its vetting process, and sourcing from a wider developer pool.

The session helped the audience understand Turing’s ‘deep jobs’ platform better and how it helps companies find the best remote developers across skills with the push of a button.

The guest list for the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference included Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

All the sessions of the event are now streaming on YouTube. Head over to Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know what you liked the most about each session in the comment section.

 

By Mar 16, 2021
Turing Events

How to Create a Seamless Remote Work Culture? Alex Bouaziz, Chris Herd, and Job van der Voort Speak at Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Firstbase’s Chris Herd, Remote.com’s Job van der Voort, and Deel’s Alex Bouaziz join Jonathan Siddharth to discuss remote work at Turing Boundaryless event

An all-CEO panel joined Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth on 18 Feb 2021 for the third session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference to talk about the unique challenges and opportunities that a remote workforce brings for organizations.

Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel, were at their absolute best as they shared their ideas on how to create seamless remote work culture.

Chris kick-started the conversation by sharing his view on how remote work can benefit a company’s culture and its employees. “What many companies are doing right now is replicating the office environment remotely, and that’s causing them to miss many of the benefits,” Chris said.

He urged organizations to look at remote work as a ‘new thing’ and take advantage of the things that are different about distributed teams.

Describing how he sees remote work, Job said: “Remote work allows you to live your life, and work is just a facet of that. I can live wherever I want. I can earn money wherever I want.”

Talking about how remote-first companies could help their employees forge strong interpersonal relationships, both Alex and Job agreed that organizations should try to understand people’s hobbies and express themselves via virtual games, hangouts, etc.

Responding to Jonathan’s question on what CEOs building boundaryless companies can achieve with a remote workforce, Chris said: “Rather than hiring the best person in a 30-mile radius of an office, you can hire the best person anywhere that you can afford for every single role. So there’s this massive talent arbitrage that companies can now fish in a global talent pool, which is incredibly important.”

“The second part is efficiency,” Chris added.  “Not only are our employees more productive and efficient as they’re not distracted in the same way that they are in an open plan environment, but we’re also far more cost-efficient because we’re not spending $15,000 to $50,000 per worker per year on office space,” he added.

Answering the same question, Alex said: “Many companies don’t understand that being distributed means establishing trust. It means that you will not be able to check if all your teammates have their greenlight on Slack every day. That’s just not going to work.” 

“From a trust angle, as long as you understand the mechanism that is right for your team, then you’re setting up the right culture,” Alex added.

Along with the above issues, the panelists also shed light on a host of other problems like hybrid work, disadvantages of being globally distributed, setting up a good home office, time zone management, communication tools, processes, workflows, etc.

There was one more thing apart from the quality of the discussion that grabbed the public’s attention during the session — Job’s webcam and workspace set-up. 

And to the delight of the live audience, Job shared the list of equipment he uses, including his Sony webcam. He also took the opportunity to highlight the importance of ergonomic chairs and desks and how companies should consider providing a budget to employees for it. He also advocated for having a monitor and not just the laptop while working.

“These are simple things that don’t have to be expensive. They make a huge difference in long-term health,” Job said.

The session gave the audience an excellent opportunity to listen to three of the best remote work experts and understand how they handle highly-productive distributed teams.

Apart from these three, a long list of Silicon Valley engineering leaders shared their ideas at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event. The speaker list included some of the best thought leaders like Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com, among others.

You can watch all the Turing Boundaryless sessions: #BuildFromAnywhere conference on our YouTube channel here and let us know in the comment section which speaker gave you the best insight about remote work.

By Mar 15, 2021
Turing Events

How to Manage Remote Developers? Engineering Leaders Explain in Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Pravin Desale, Suneela Joshi, Anna Chukaeva, Henrik Hussfelt, Andy O’Dower explain how to manage remote developers in Turing’s #BuildFromAnywhere conference.

A panel of high-profile engineering leaders joined Turing.com CRO Prakash Gupta for the second session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to share their experiences managing remote developers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The guest list for the second session included Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy, and Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product at Carlease.com.

From challenges to solutions, the panelists touched upon various issues regarding remote teams. They also revealed their first preference when it comes to fully-remote or hybrid. Here are the key takeaways from the session in case you missed it.

Describing the hurdles that his team faced during the early months of the pandemic, Pravin said. However, his organization had to deal with many challenges starting from product development processes to customers’ data safety. They learned a lot out of those problems.

“I think it has made our company better for the future. There’s no question about it,” Pravin said.

Expressing similar thoughts, Suneela said: “We were forced to take on remote, but it has worked out well.”

She also explained how her company tried a mix of remote and office-going employees to mitigate the challenges.

Henrik, who was one of Proxy’s first remote engineers, while sharing his experience, said: “When Covid hit, the whole company had to do what we did every day. But getting the organization to get to the same state took quite a while.”

Andy, who is now with live streaming platform Wowza, told the audience that they had to make some changes and break some old tools and some old habits as part of the leadership team.

“I think we were able to grow the business certainly and help customers in a time of need, but it did require both company changes and a roadmap change in our product,” he said.

During her turn, Anna said that the challenges for her organization were all about the people. “We need to build trust. And trust is hard to build, especially if somebody is remote and in a different time zone. How are we going to do that?” she said. The answer she explained was in listening to your team members and implementing their feedback.

Moving ahead, the speakers also spoke about the many steps that they took to overcome the initial challenges of remote work.

According to Henrik, he and his team took some ideas from GitLab’s guidebook and implemented them in their organization. He suggested anyone who needs to understand how to run a remote organization should look at that guidebook. You can find the link to the guidebook here.

Talking about distributed teams, Andy said that companies needed a mindset shift when it comes to remote first. He added that previously organizations used to hire candidates keeping the physical office model in mind, but now they must recruit people keeping remote work at the forefront.    

While Pravin spoke about the importance of a sense of belonging and purpose at the individual engineer level, Suneela shed light on factors such as flexibility and empathy for remote employees.

Adding to these two speakers’ views, Anna talked about the significance of feedback in a distributed team and how she implemented a program to collect the proper feedback to solve many of the problems related to remote teams.

The session ended with a small poll where most of the panelists barring Henrik, said they expect their organizations to go for a hybrid remote set-up in a post-Covid world. Henrik voted in favor of a fully-remote setup.

You can watch the entire session on Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know in the comment section what you liked the most about the conversation.

This post concludes our recap of the second of the four sessions of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event. Keep checking this space for highlights from the rest of the sessions.

By Mar 15, 2021
Turing News

Turing Named One of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021 by Forbes

Turing ranked 16th out of the 500 companies selected for Forbes’ list of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021.

Turing.com has earned a coveted spot on Forbes’ List of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021. Out of 500 companies named to the illustrious list, Turing ranked 6th in the Business Products and Software Services category and 16th overall. 

Leading media outlet Forbes teamed up with market research firm Statista to identify fast-growing startups that employees love. Forbes lauded the selected employers for “attracting and engaging employees through virtual games, classes, and support systems in a year unlike any other.” 

Forbes compiled the list using an innovative methodology based on three key factors, namely employer reputation, employee satisfaction, and growth. Ultimately, Forbes made their selections through an in-depth analysis of over 7 million data points. Out of 10,000 eligible American businesses, only 500 firms made it to Forbes’ list of the best startup employers.

To Turing, this recognition is more meaningful, especially because of its exclusively remote workforce. The company works hard to cultivate an inclusive, positive, and engaging work culture for its globally distributed team of employees. 

The accolade is a testament to how united Turing’s team members are behind the company’s mission to source, vet, hire, match, and manage remote software developers for top-tier US companies. Driven by the company’s core values of continuous improvement, speed, and focus on long-term customer-centricity, Turing’s employees are dedicated to shaping the future of work. 

What’s more, Turing has witnessed exponential growth in the past year and a half, adding several brilliant, highly-skilled employees to its global team. The company continues to grow in size and strength in tandem with its thriving and rapidly multiplying base of 300K developers looking to find jobs with top US companies. 

“We’re thrilled to be named one of America’s Best Startup Employers by Forbes,” said Turing CEO and co-founder Jonathan Siddharth. “Our employees are the backbone of our organization. I’m proud of what we’ve achieved together. This accolade will help accelerate our mission to hire the best talent in the world, irrespective of location.”

The Forbes honor comes close on the heels of other industry-wide recognitions for Turing, such as its inclusion in Fast Company’s prestigious list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021. 

You can find Forbes’ complete list of America’s Best Startup Employers here. While evaluating Turing, Forbes reviewed articles, blogs, social media posts, Turing’s online reviews, website traffic, and company headcounts. To learn more about the Forbes methodology in detail, head here.  

If you’re a company looking to build globally distributed, exceptionally talented software teams, Turing can help you hire from the top 1% of the world’s remote developers. If you’re a brilliant software engineer looking to work at Silicon Valley and US-based companies, you can apply now to remote Turing jobs.

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By Mar 12, 2021
Turing News

Turing Named to Fast Company’s Annual List of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021

Leading media outlet Fast Company names Turing to its annual list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021.

Turing has been named to Fast Company’s prestigious annual list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021. 

Fast Company published the list today, saying it “honors the businesses that have not only found a way to be resilient in the past year but also turned those challenges into impact-making processes. These companies did more than survive; they thrived—making an impact on their industries and culture as a whole.”

Fast Company named Turing one of the top 10 companies in the Workplace category, noting Turing’s contribution to enabling companies to source, vet, hire, and manage remote workers during the pandemic.  

“In a year of unprecedented challenges, the companies on this list exhibit fearlessness, ingenuity, and creativity in the face of crisis,” said Fast Company Deputy Editor David Lidsky, who oversaw the issue with Senior Editor Amy Farley. Fast Company is one of the world’s leading media outlets covering technology, design, and innovation.

“We are thrilled to be named one of the world’s most innovative companies by Fast Company,” said Jonathan Siddharth, co-founder, and Turing CEO. “Turing created the first and only intelligent talent cloud in 2020 using innovations in data science to drive sourcing, vetting, matching, and managing of remote software developers across the globe for US-based fast-scaling startups, tech unicorns, and global enterprises. We have changed an entire industry, reducing friction and helping companies hire elite remote software developers in as little as three days, compared with an industry standard of many weeks to months.”

Jonathan further explained Turing’s role in democratizing opportunity for talented people everywhere. “Talent is global, but opportunity is not. We are working to change this by opening up exceptional opportunities for talented developers regardless of where they happen to live,” he said.

Fast Company said, to create the list, its editors and writers “sought out the most groundbreaking businesses across the globe and industries.” 

The World’s Most Innovative Companies list is Fast Company’s signature franchise and one of its most highly anticipated editorial efforts of the year. “It provides both a snapshot and a road map for the future of innovation across the most dynamic sectors of the economy,” Fast Company said. 

Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies issue (March/April 2021) is now available online here, as well as in app form via iTunes and on newsstands beginning March 16, 2021. #FCMostInnovative. 

US companies looking to build and scale remote teams of software developers can, with Turing, hire from a giant, global talent pool of 200,000+ senior, pre-vetted software engineers. Exceptionally talented remote developers looking to work with the best companies in the world can apply to remote Turing jobs now.

By Mar 9, 2021
Turing Events

Key Takeaways from Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Top engineering leaders who have built large, remote developer teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and enterprises came together at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to discuss the strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams.  Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth kicked off the event with opening… View Article

Top engineering leaders who have built large, remote developer teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and enterprises came together at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to discuss the strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams. 

Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth kicked off the event with opening remarks where he elaborated about the massive advantages of being a remote-first company and why Silicon Valley tech giants are going for distributed teams.

“The new way is to look for the best people in the world who could contribute to your company’s success, not the best people who happen to be living near your office,” Jonathan said.

The guest list for the conference included Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

The much-awaited event delivered what it promised and much more as all the sessions were full of solid nuggets of wisdom. Here are the key takeaways from each session of the event in case you missed it.

1st Session: Secrets of Running High-Performance Remote Teams

GitLab’s Head of Remote, Darren Murph, joined Jonathan for the first session and discussed the do’s and don’ts behind successful remote-first companies. The conversation was full of new ideas as the duo touched upon various issues ranging from the importance of culture in remote work to asynchronous communication to time zone management. 

Answering Jonathan’s questions, Darren explained some of the key concepts of remote work like ‘transparency and belonging,’ ‘psychological safety,’ ‘values fit,’ ‘documentation,’ etc., in detail.

“Many companies haven’t drawn the parallel between transparency in your work and belonging in your culture. But what we believe is that the more transparency and visibility that the entire team has to each other’s work, the easier it is for people to feel like they belong.” Darren said.

“Belonging is crucial to culture, especially in a remote environment,” he added.

During the session, Darren also shared his views about remote-first and hybrid-remote companies.

2nd Session: Managing Remote Engineers – Lessons from the Field

Turing.com CRO Prakash Gupta moderated the second session featuring renowned engineering leaders including Pravin Desale, Suneela Joshi, Anna Chukaeva, Andy O’Dower, and Henrik Hussfelt.

The high-profile panelists, who had gone through the challenges of managing remote teams during the initial months of the Covid-19 pandemic, gave the audience a unique opportunity to understand the key lessons that they had learned from the field. 

“Remote-first is a mindset that you must apply to every aspect of your management,” Andy said. 

The engineering leaders also discussed the formulae that they implemented during the pandemic to continue to hire, onboard, and define success for a remote software engineer.

 The session ended with a small poll where most of the panelists, barring Henrik, said they expect their organizations to go for a hybrid-cum-remote set-up in a post-Covid world.

3rd Session: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Managing a Global Remote Workforce

A new ‘remote-work mafia’ joined Jonathan for the penultimate session to discuss some of the challenges and opportunities to create a seamless, remote work culture. Firstbase’s Chris Herd, Remote.com’s Job van der Voort, and Deel’s Alex Bouaziz were at their absolute best during the conversation to give the audience an enthralling panel discussion.

Describing his philosophy about remote work, Job said: “Remote work allows you to live your life, and work is just a facet of that. I can live wherever I want. I can earn money wherever I want.”

Responding to Jonathan’s question on what CEOs building boundaryless companies can achieve with remote workers, Chris said: “Rather than hiring the best person in a 30-mile radius of an office, you can hire the best person on the planet that you can afford for every single role. So there’s this massive talent arbitrage that companies can now fish in a global talent pool, which is incredibly important.”

“The second part is efficiency. Our employees are more productive and efficient because they’re not distracted in the same way that they would be in an open-plan environment. We’re also far more cost-efficient because we’re not spending $15,000 to $50,000 per worker per year on office space,” he added.

Answering the same question, Alex said: “Many companies don’t understand that being distributed means establishing trust. It means that you will not be able to check if all your teammates have their greenlight on Slack every day. That’s just not going to work.” 

“From a trust angle, as long as you understand the mechanism that is right for your team, then you’re setting up the right culture,” Alex added.

The panelists touched upon a variety of subjects from helping people build strong interpersonal relationships, to the disadvantages of being globally distributed, to setting up a functional home office. They also shared their thoughts on specific tools, processes, workflows,  and more.

Apart from the quality of the discussion, there was one more thing that grabbed the audience’s attention — Job’s webcam and workspace set-up. 

And to the delight of the live audience, Job shared the list of equipment he uses, including his Sony webcam. He also took the opportunity to highlight the importance of ergonomic chairs and desks and how companies should consider providing a budget to employees for it.

4th Session: How to Stop Worrying and Love Remote

The final session saw an all-Turing team explaining how they build the world’s most-advanced vetting and matching system to match developer talent with opportunities on a global scale.

The speakers for this session included Turing.com co-founder and CTO Vijay Krishnan, VP of engineering Zan Doan, senior growth product manager Chul Kwon, and senior product manager Alex Sung.

Describing the reason behind the consistent increase in the number of customers demanding Turing developers, Vijay said: “The reasons are threefold intelligent vetting, speed of hiring, and scalable quality control.”

The panelists also shed light on Turing’s products that are generating tremendous value for both customers and developers.

Zan explained how Turing uses the lessons from Facebook, Google, Uber, and other top engineering organizations to produce an intelligent vetting engine. He said: “At Turing, we cover all important vetting areas that help us find great engineers and make them successful working with Turing customers.” “We created more than 100 automated assessments, not only to cover vetting standards in the Bay Area but also to assess other critical aspects of the engineer,” Zan added.

Zan also described the Turing way to manage remote developers effectively.

During his turn, Chul helped the audience understand how Turing’s seniority assessment test, algorithm coding interview, and automated vetting flows help companies hire top engineers on demand. 

“By leveraging data science, we have reduced vetting time to just six hours. Our process means you can have the world’s best engineers in not sixty days, but seven days,” Chul said.

Talking about Turing’s deep developer profiles, Alex said: “Turing developer profiles are detailed, comprehensive, continuously updating, representations of our developers. They only show validated skills, enriched by on-the-job performance data.”

He also explained the Turing Workspace and the Turing Virtual Machine’s importance in managing remote talent efficiently and keeping firms’ code safe, respectively.

The event concluded with Jonathan’s closing remarks, where he thanked all the panelists for sharing their valuable insights with the public.

The conference allowed the audience to know the nitty-gritty of remote work and to understand the thought process of some of the best minds in the remote business.

All the sessions of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event are now streaming on YouTube. Head over to Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know what you liked the most about each session in the comment section.

By Mar 5, 2021
Turing Events

GitLab’s Darren Murph reveals secrets of running high-performance remote teams at Turing’s #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Darren Murph, GitLab’s head of remote, shares the do’s and don’ts of high-performance remote teams at Turing’s Boundaryless #BuildFromAnywhere Conference

If you ever had a question regarding the successful management of remote teams, then you need to listen to GitLab’s Head of Remote, Darren Murph. Darren leads people, culture, operations, inclusivity, marketing, employer, branding, and communications at GitLab,  one of the world’s most successful remote startups with more than 1,300 employees distributed across 67 countries.

Murph recently sat down with Turing.com CEO Jonathan Siddharth for a conversation at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference and revealed his secrets for hiring and running high-performance remote teams.

He touched upon various issues ranging from the importance of culture in remote work to asynchronous communication to time zone management. He also shared a few interesting suggestions for remote-first as well as hybrid-remote companies. Here are the key takeaways from the session in case you missed it.

Transparency and Belonging

Keeping everyone working together as one unit when they’re all remote is a challenge for any company. So, when Murph was asked by Siddharth how GitLab handles such an issue, he credited Gitlab’s tooling and culture for successfully addressing the problem. He also pointed out the significance of ‘transparency’ and ‘belonging’ for healthy relationships.

 “Many companies haven’t drawn the parallel between transparency in your work and belonging in your culture. But what we believe is that the more transparency and visibility that the entire team has to each other’s work, the easier it is for people to feel like they belong,” Murph said.

“Belonging is crucial to culture, especially in a remote environment.”

Asynchronous Communication

In remote work, different people work at different times of the day. And this is where, according to Murph, asynchronous communication becomes crucial.

“Asynchronous is what I call the superpower of remote teams. That is the sign that you’ve evolved past the skeuomorphic ‘shift and lift type of approach,’ where you try to copy the office environment and paste it into a virtual environment, into one where you’re much more thoughtful about how work can take shape and take place,” Murph said.

During the conversation with Siddharth, he also stressed that it is not just a matter of efficiency and productivity; it is also about respecting the other person’s time.

 “We think it’s a matter of respect. If you can move a project forward without demanding that someone be online at the same time as you, you’re fundamentally more respectful for [Sic] their time.”

Signaling is Important

Murph also touched upon the subject of a post-Covid-19 world. Siddharth asked what possible mistakes firms should avoid after the pandemic. Darren said companies should not let their exec teams rush back to offices as it has a negative signaling effect.

“If you have a long-term lease on a building, and you will have people back into that building, make sure that the executives stay out to help force your workflows. We call these forcing functions to be more inclusive and remote first.”

And for those who are considering a hybrid-remote structure, Murph urged them to be very careful. “It’s fundamentally more difficult to manage and make equitable two different playing fields compared to one or the other.”

Where You Work or How You Work?

One of the key things that Murph told Siddharth during the conversation was that a lot of the proven principles on all-remote and remote-first are equally applicable to hybrid-remote or even co-located organizations.

“Remote first isn’t about where you work. It’s about how you work. So if someone chooses to go to the office, they shouldn’t work fundamentally differently than if they’re at their home. So when you’re thinking about what are the considerations to make sure hybrid goes well, convert all of your work processes so that they’re equally seamless away from the office as they are in the office,” he said.

Talking about some of the well-known tools that GitLab uses, Murph explained why they just use existing tools in innovative ways.

Answering Siddharth’s question about using the popular app Slack at GitLab, Murph said that Slack messages expire after 90 days at his organization. 

And the reason behind this is that Gitlab wants its staff to work in their internal platform as it is “far more transparent and less siloed than working in Slack.”

Now, like many, you might be wondering how and why GitLab uses Slack then?

According to Murph, people at GitLab don’t use Slack for work; instead, they use it to communicate with their colleagues about other things like parenting and hiking and cooking, etc. “It’s a lot easier to use that as a bit of a virtual water cooler and have human-to-human conversations when you are also expected to do work in the same medium.”

Culture of Documenting Everything

The Head of Remote also explained the vital role that documentation plays for a company.

 “It makes your day more efficient when you don’t have to answer things over and over and over. If you answered it once, you’re able to share the link around,” he said.

“If it’s not in the handbook, it doesn’t exist. And we’re serious about that. We try very hard to make sure that we ask others what we would expect from ourselves, which is document, document, document. So the people around the world and whatever [Sic] timezone they’re in have more access to that information.”

Psychological Safety

When asked by Siddharth to give a piece of advice that CEOs of remote-first companies can follow to bring people together, Murph said, “Create psychological safety so that people can be who they are.”

He believes that people in the leadership should encourage employees to bring their individualized stories back to the workplace.

“Those are the real stories that give you insight into who your colleagues are. And those stories are much more valuable than small talk about the weather. But it requires leadership to say, we trust that you can build culture outside of work, and we’re going to create a psychologically safe atmosphere for you to bring that back into work.”

Values Fit

Shedding light on one of the secrets behind GitLab’s success, Murph told the audience they take candidates through GitLab’s values during the interview to see if people align from a value standpoint.

“We don’t even hire for culture fit. We hire for values fit,” Darren said.

“As long as we’re assured that we’re both working in accordance to the same values, then we want all of that individual brought to work.” 

In the end, Murph also shared the link to GitLab’s handbook on running remote-first teams while answering a couple of questions from the audience. You can watch the full session on Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know in the comment section what you liked the most about the conversation.

Apart from Murph, a long list of Silicon Valley engineering leaders shared their ideas at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildfromAnywhere event. The speaker list included some of the best thought leaders like Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com; Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

This was the recap of the first of the four sessions of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildfromAnywhere event. Keep checking this space for highlights from the rest of the sessions. 

By Mar 1, 2021
Turing Events

Silicon Valley Tech Leaders to Share Strategies for Managing High-Productivity Remote Teams – #BuildFromAnywhere

Register Today to Hear from Silicon Valley Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT Have you ever wondered how successful remote-first companies source, vet, and hire their offshore developers? Or how they manage remote teams at scale to solve for speed… View Article

Register Today to Hear from Silicon Valley Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT

Have you ever wondered how successful remote-first companies source, vet, and hire their offshore developers? Or how they manage remote teams at scale to solve for speed and quality?

If you have, then here’s your chance to listen to the top minds in the business at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event and find answers to the above questions.

Silicon Valley engineering leaders from fast-scaling startups and global brands will discuss the strategies behind successful remote software development teams. Register now to get an opportunity to learn how engineering leaders from Facebook, Google, Uber, and Stanford successfully solve the various problems that come with distributed teams.

These experts, who have built large, remote engineering teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and global enterprises, will also present the latest strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams.

The guest list for the much-awaited event includes some of the best thought leaders who will share their ideas with you live. Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com; Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others will be joining the event.

For more information, including the agenda, please visit the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event page. 

Check back regularly to stay updated as we add additional speakers to the agenda.

The Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere will take place on February 18th, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT.

Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere is sponsored by Turing.com, an automated platform that lets companies hire Silicon Valley-caliber remote developers at the touch of a button from a global talent pool of more than 200,000 software engineers.

By Feb 11, 2021
Boundaryless Build From Anywhere Event
Turing News

How Do Engineering Leaders from Facebook, Google, Uber & Stanford Hire and Manage Remote Teams?

At Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, engineering leaders are all set to discuss how to source, vet, onboard, and manage talented remote teams.

Join Us to Learn from Elite Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT

If you’ve ever wondered how engineering leaders at some of the world’s biggest companies hire and manage distributed software development teams, you’re in luck…

Today’s engineering leaders have the opportunity to hire talent from anywhere in the world. Boundaryless teams mean you can hire not based upon geography, but talent and specific needs. Remote, distributed engineering teams, also provide new levels of diversity, the kind that research shows increase productivity and creative thinking

Save your spot! Register Today to Learn how to Solve Your Remote Work Challenges
This new way of working comes with challenges. How do you source, vet, and onboard remote developers? Once onboarded, how do you manage such developers to maximize performance, integration, and communication?

On February 18th, beginning at 11 AM PST, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from senior executives that have scaled companies leveraging the power of distributed engineers from all over the world. 

Highlights of Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event include:

  • An intimate conversation with senior leaders including Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories, and Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas, as they share their hard-won knowledge in our “Lessons from the Field” panel
  • Sneak peeks at the tools and technologies the fastest-growing companies rely on to help them build elastic engineering teams, virtually at the push of a button
  • A one-on-one fireside chat between GitLabs Head of Remote, Darren Murph, and Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth

Who should attend? 
Whether you need to hire a single engineer or multiple product development teams, Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event will help you understand how remote-first companies overcome the challenges of having a fully distributed structure. It will also show how they leverage global talent to save time, speed product development, and avoid the many bottlenecks that happen when your recruiting efforts are limited to talent pools within 20 minutes of a home office.

If you’re an engineering manager, a senior executive with hiring responsibility, or a founder that needs to build a team in a hurry, Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere will give you a competitive advantage when it comes to finding, and managing the talent that will help you meet your objectives faster, more efficiently, and within budget.

So if you are looking for the latest strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote software development teams, register today to hear from: 

Darren MurphDarren Murph
Head of Remote, GitLab

Chris Hear FirstbaseChris Herd 
CEO, Firstbase

Suneela Joshi Abbott LaboratoriesSuneela Joshi
Sr. Director of Engineering,
Abbott Laboratories

Pravin Desale VeritasPravin Desale
SVP of SDS and Appliances,
Veritas

Anna Chukaeva Carta HealthcareAnna Chukaeva
Co-Founder/COO,
Carta Healthcare

Job van der Vort Remote.comJob van der Voort  
CEO,
Remote.com

Alex Bouaziz DeelAlex Bouaziz
CEO, Deel

Henrik Hussfelt ProxyHenrik Hussfelt
Director of Engineering, Proxy

Andy O’Dower Carlease.comAndy O’Dower
Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of  Product,
Carlease.com

 

For more information, including the agenda, please visit the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event Page. Do remember to check back regularly as we add additional speakers to the schedule.

The future is Boundaryless! What about you?

By Feb 2, 2021
How Turing’s CEO Raised Capital Using the 'Parallel Fundraising' Approach
Turing Desk

How Turing’s CEO Raised Capital Using The ‘Parallel Fundraising’ Approach

Turing co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth spills the beans on how he raised seed capital from high-profile investors using the parallel fundraising approach.

2020 provided one watershed moment after another for Turing. The company grew 17x in revenue (from $700K to almost $12 million), expanded its customer base to include several high-profile companies, and last but not least, raised nearly $50 million in venture funding. In September 2020, Turing announced a $14 million seed round of funding led by Foundation Capital, followed by a $32 million Series B round led by industry-heavyweights including WestBridge Capital, a fund with over $3 billion under management, along with Foundation Capital. The quick capital raises remain notable for several reasons: not only did Turing co-founders Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishnan raise a large sum in a relatively short amount of time, but the duo also did so in the midst of a global pandemic. 

What’s the key to raising a sizable amount of funds for your start-up? In a post that recently appeared in Entrepreneur Magazines, Jonathan explains

Convention largely dictates that at first, entrepreneurs spend 100% of their time setting up their companies then pivot 180 degrees to focus entirely on securing additional funding. Along with Vijay, Jonathan employed this strategy while building and successfully selling their previous AI-backed start-up, Rover. Thanks to this learning experience, they decided there could be a smarter way to raise capital. Thus, with Turing, the two co-founders turned conventional fundraising on its head. The duo dedicated 80% of their time to company building while channeling the remaining 20% into fundraising. Jonathan terms this ‘parallel fundraising.’  

To derive maximum benefit from a parallel fundraising approach, Jonathan recommends following some simple principles. First, synchronously apply investor insights to your company-building activities. Think about it: gathering and implementing investor feedback is simpler while you’re in development mode than it is right before you’re ready to go to market. This way, you don’t need to overhaul your product moments ahead of a market-wide launch, all in an attempt to meet investor expectations. 

Second, during your seed round of funding, leverage SAFE (Simple Agreement for Future Equity) notes, an increasingly popular form of convertible security. You can use them on a rolling basis, which fittingly complements the parallel funding approach. What’s more, with SAFE notes, you can progressively adjust your valuation cap. Jonathan recommends beginning with smaller, more reasonable tranches. 

Finally, measure the impact of an investor meeting by the number of valuable insights you collect, not by the amount of funding you secure. To make the most of such feedback and insights from investors, Jonathan suggests identifying their ‘superpower’ that is, their area of savvy and expertise. This strategy allows you to pinpoint whom to approach for help with a particular business challenge. 

To recap, parallel fundraising that is, strategically splitting time between company-building and fundraising is the secret sauce behind Turing’s significant fundraising numbers. To make the most of this fundraising technique, co-founder Jonathan prescribes three key points to bear in mind: take full advantage of the continuous flow of investor insights, opt for the SAFE fundraising route, and take keen notice of ‘investor superpowers.’ 

To read about Jonathan’s parallel fundraising approach in greater detail, head here. 

If you’re a company looking to build a world-class team of software engineers, you can, with Turing, hire senior, pre-vetted remote developers from a talent pool of 200,000 engineers at the push of a button. If you’re an exceptionally talented software engineer who wants to take the global tech market by storm, you can apply to top remote Turing jobs now.

By Feb 1, 2021
Turing Launches Deep Developer Profiles and Virtual Machines
Turing News

Turing Launches Deep Developer Profiles and Virtual Machines

Turing’s talent platform debuts new features, such as deep developer profiles and virtual machines, to quickly vet top developers and enforce code security.

Turing pioneers deep developer profiles and virtual machines to speed-up hiring of remote developers, secure code, and ensure productivity.

Turing is delighted to debut several key new features for its automated talent-cloud platform; its new features include deep developer profiles and virtual machine capabilities. These exciting new capabilities will further enhance the company’s ability to match pre-vetted, highly-skilled software developers from around the world to startups and enterprise companies. Turing’s co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth explained, “Our deep developer profiles help fast-scaling startups and enterprises that need to quickly hire high-caliber software engineers find their ideal matches through a rich profile that goes way beyond what can be gleaned from a resume and interview. Our new Turing Virtual Machines give our customers peace of mind by securing their code and ensuring developer productivity.”

Fast-tracking the matching process with deep developer profiles

Turing Deep Developer ProfilesWhere Facebook and Uber build deep user profiles, Turing creates deep developer profiles. The new deep developer profiles are designed to bring forth maximum speed, efficiency, and accuracy in matching top engineers to the best Silicon Valley and US-based firms. Each profile comprises an exhaustive set of indicators and benchmarks, such as skill-level test scores, communication skills assessments, live coding sessions, and much more. 

Manually assembling candidate profiles at this scale and magnitude would require mammoth manpower. What makes Turing’s deep developer profiles possible is its AI-driven software, which automatically  and seamlessly compiles candidate profiles. Moreover, unlike conventional profiles, which remain static and require manual updates, Turing’s deep developer profiles are dynamic. For instance, each time a developer picks up a new skill or acquires more experience, their developer profile instantly reflects that. To make future matches all the more accurate, the profiles are also continually updated with on-the-job performance data. The dynamic and comprehensive nature of Turing’s deep developer profiles is a class apart in the industry. 

Enforcing code security and monitoring productivity with virtual machines

Turing Virtual MachinesUntil now, code security has remained one of the prime concerns of employing software developers remotely. With Turing’s virtual machines, the risks become much more manageable. Turing’s virtual machines create a secure and powerful software development environment for its engineers. Here, software developers work on a platform over which the hiring company has complete control. Consequently, no piece of code can be copied or transferred to a different device without explicit permission from the hiring company. The platform also gives companies eagle-eyed visibility into their developers’ work and enables them to automatically and regularly track employee productivity. This way, hiring companies can effortlessly collaborate with Turing’s developers and keep tabs on their progress, without worrying about code security. 

Lastly, Turing’s virtual machines create a powerful coding environment for developers who might be otherwise unable to procure one. Now, talented software developers from regions with limited access to resources need not be constrained by a lack of high-end hardware. 

And that’s not all. Turing’s platform update also boasts of new features like enhanced developer stand-up meeting capabilities, a more sophisticated time-tracker, and superior functionalities surrounding bi-weekly productivity check-ins and quarterly performance reviews.

Reinventing the IT service sector with software & data science

Turing has pioneered a new category of software solutions by enabling companies to merely push a button to hire and manage teams in the cloud. True to its core company value of ‘continuous improvement,’ the firm continues to innovate new and novel software solutions like deep developer profiles and virtual machines. With Turing, co-founders Jonathan and Vijay Krishnan are building a deep jobs platform that offers tools and resources for every step of the employment lifecycle, all the way from onboarding and timezone management to productivity tracking and performance mapping. 

If you’re a company looking to build a world-class team of software engineers, you can, with Turing, hire senior, pre-vetted remote developers from a talent pool of 200,000 engineers at the push of a button. If you’re an exceptionally talented software engineer who wants to take the global tech market by storm, you can apply to top remote Turing jobs now. 

About Turing.com

Turing.com is an automated platform that lets companies “push a button” to hire and manage remote software developers. Turing uses data science to automatically source, vet, match, and manage remote developers worldwide. Turing has 200,000 developers on the platform from 10,000 cities in the world. Turing’s mission is to help every remote-first technology company build boundaryless teams and to democratize opportunity for software developers all over the world. Turing’s investors include WestBridge Capital, Foundation Capital, Adam D’Angelo, Facebook’s first CTO & CEO of Quora; Gokul Rajaram; Cyan Banister; Beerud Sheth, founder of Upwork; Jeff Morris Jr.; as well as executives from Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Amazon. TechCrunch, The Information, Entrepreneur, and other major publications have profiled Turing.

By Jan 29, 2021
WestBridge and Foundation Capital Leaders Join Turing's Board of Directors
Turing News

Turing Welcomes Foundation Capital & WestBridge Capital Leaders onto its Board of Directors

Turing is pleased to announce that it is expanding its Board of Directors, adding Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, and Sumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital. The move comes after Turing’s $32-million Series B funding round, led by the $3.3-billion fund WestBridge Capital, along with Foundation Capital, which led Turing’s earlier… View Article

Turing is pleased to announce that it is expanding its Board of Directors, adding Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, and Sumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital. The move comes after Turing’s $32-million Series B funding round, led by the $3.3-billion fund WestBridge Capital, along with Foundation Capital, which led Turing’s earlier round. To date, Turing has raised nearly $50 million in venture funding.

Turing’s co-founders Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishnan will continue to serve on the company’s Board. Siddharth is Turing’s CEO, while Krishnan is Turing’s CTO. The new, expanded Board will meet in January. 

“Ashu and Sumir are both highly accomplished venture capitalists that bring a wealth of experience in scaling B2B tech companies,” said Siddharth. “Ashu has unique expertise in working with technical founders of AI-enabled businesses such as Cohesity, Eightfold, and Fortanix, among others. Sumir’s experience and connections in the IT services industry will enhance Turing’s go-to-market strategy, especially among enterprise customers,” he added. 

Turing founders Siddharth and Krishnan discovered the massive potential of globally distributed teams while successfully scaling their last AI-backed content start-up with exceptional remote talent. Propelled by the global shift to remote work, Turing taps into a giant global pool of remote software developers to help firms hire in markets such as Silicon Valley and New York, where hiring and retaining the best software engineers is often difficult and costly. Turing rigorously vets software developers for a Silicon Valley bar. 

Turing has achieved dramatic growth over the past two years growing revenue 17X over the last 14 months, from $700K to almost $12 Million. The company has also had nearly 200,000 of the world’s top software developers sign up for the Turing jobs platform. Additionally, several high-profile Silicon Valley technology companies have also come on board as customers. The global pandemic has compelled companies to adopt remote-first and remote-friendly policies, which has opened up gigantic global talent pools from which to recruit. 

If you’re a company that needs to scale engineering capacity quickly, Turing can help you hire Silicon Valley-caliber developers who work in your timezone. If you’re a highly-skilled developer who wants to take the global tech market by storm, you can apply to top remote Turing jobs.

By Jan 8, 2021
Turing Raises $32M in Series B
Turing News

Turing Announces $32M in Series B led by WestBridge Capital and Foundation Capital

In a landmark moment in Turing’s history, the company is delighted to announce that it has raised $32 million in a Series B Round. The current investment was led by $3.3 Billion Investment Fund WestBridge Capital, with earlier round lead investor Foundation Capital, Altair Capital, Mindset Ventures, Frontier Ventures, and Gaingels participating. This milestone comes… View Article

In a landmark moment in Turing’s history, the company is delighted to announce that it has raised $32 million in a Series B Round. The current investment was led by $3.3 Billion Investment Fund WestBridge Capital, with earlier round lead investor Foundation Capital, Altair Capital, Mindset Ventures, Frontier Ventures, and Gaingels participating. This milestone comes close on the heels of the company’s $14 million seed funding in August. The latest round takes the total investments made into Turing to nearly $50 million from top funds and high-profile investors. 

WestBridge, for instance, has a wealth of experience in investing in global IT companies like Cognizant and GlobalLogic. Turing’s unique data science and AI-driven approach to talent acquisition motivated WestBridge to invest. Says Westbridge Capital’s Managing Director Sumir Chadha, “Instead of setting up buildings and having developers work inside offices, Turing creates a new category with talent in the cloud. Top-tier talent sourced by software, vetted by software, matched by software, and managed by software, massively increasing the scalability and efficiency of the business”.

For Ashu Garg, Managing Partner at Foundation Capital, Turing’s economic potential stood out right from the get-go — and continues to do so. Said Mr. Garg, “Today, I’m bullish on the economic potential of companies like Turing that will be foundational to the future of remote work. Such is our belief in Turing that we led the company’s seed round, and we are a major participant in their current raise”. 

Turing’s turbo-charged growth story

Driven by the massive global shift to remote work, Turing taps into a worldwide pool of developers to help companies remotely hire top developers in Silicon Valley, New York, and other tech hubs, where hiring and retaining top engineers is highly competitive and typically expensive. 

Since going live 14 months ago, Turing’s revenues increased 17x, from $700K to $12 million in November 2020. Over this period, the company’s client-base has expanded considerably. Current customers include VillageMD, Lambda School, Plume, Ohi Tech, Carta Healthcare, and Proxy.

Turing’s remote developer cohort has continued to expand. Over 180,000 developers from across 10,000 cities have signed up to the Turing jobs platform (compared to 150,000 in August). About 50,000 of these Turing developers have gone through the company’s AI-powered automated vetting on the platform. By 2022, the company believes it will create over 1000 remote developer jobs. 

The massive shift to remote work has helped accelerate Turing’s growth. The past five months have achieved two years’ worth of transformation across many industries, particularly those that rely on software development. This year’s pandemic has led companies to embrace remote-friendly policies and open up to hiring global talent. As Turing investor Daniel Ibri, Managing Partner at Mindset Ventures, puts it, “Remote work is an unstoppable trend worldwide that just got accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic. Turing is leading the market, and we are bullish on its ability to grow and thrive.”

How Turing plans to leverage this momentum

Turing’s co-founders Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishnan, have major plans for the firm’s future. They intend to use this additional capital to scale Turing’s platform, enhance its AI-driven automated matching software and workforce management tools, and grow its product, sales, marketing, and communication teams. 

Of course, this wouldn’t be possible without Turing’s investors. The company extends its heartfelt gratitude to its backers for putting their faith in the company’s vision and team. In addition to the aforementioned, Turing’s investors include Adam D’Angelo (Facebook’s first CTO and CEO at Quora), Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, and Scott Banister, Beerud Sheth (the founder of Upwork), Founders Fund, Chapter One Ventures (Jeff Morris Jr), Plug and Play Tech Ventures (Saeed Amidi), UpHonest Capital (​Wei Guo, Ellen Ma​), Ideas & Capital (Xavier Ponce de León), 500 Startups Vietnam (Binh Tran and Eddie Thai), Canvas Ventures (Gary Little), B Capital (Karen Appleton P​age, Kabir Narang), Peak State Ventures (​Bryan Ciambella, Seva Zakharov)​, Stanford StartX Fund, Amino C​apital, ​Spike Ventures, Visary Capital (Faizan Khan), Brainstorm Ventures (Ariel Jaduszliwer), Dmitry Chernyak, Lorenzo Thione, Shariq Rizvi, Siqi Chen, Yi Ding, Sunil Rajaraman, Parakram Khandpur, Kintan Brahmbhatt, Cameron Drummond, Kevin Moore, Sundeep Ahuja, Auren Hoffman, Greg Back, Sean Foote, Kelly Graziadei, Bobby Balachandran, Ajith Samuel, Aakash Dhuna, Adam Canady, Steffen Nauman, Sybille Nauman, Eric Cohen, Vlad V, Marat Kichikov, Piyush Prahladka, Manas Joglekar, Vladimir Khristenko, Tim and Melinda Thompson, Alexandr Katalov, Joseph and Lea Anne Ng, Jed Ng, Eric Bunting, Rafael Carmona, Jorge Carmona, Viacheslav Turpanov, James Borow, Ray Carroll, Suzanne Fletcher, Denis Beloglazov, Tigran Nazaretian, Andrew Kamotskiy, Ilya Poz, Natalia Shkirtil, Ludmila Khrapchenko, Ustavshchikov Sergey, Maxim Matcin, and Peggy Ferrell.


If you’re a company that needs to scale your engineering capacity quickly, Turing can help you hire from the top 1% of the world’s developers. If you’re a highly-skilled developer that wants to take your career to the next level, you can apply to top remote developer jobs at Turing. With Turing’s talent-cloud, the future of work is boundaryless.

By Dec 17, 2020
People in a co-working space
Management

Best Tools for Managing a Remote Team

When deciding which tools to use with remote workers, think about the projects that you’ll need your remote team to complete, as well as how you want them to interact with your local team. You’ll want to choose tools that allow your teams to work efficiently and effectively. Since your organization will have a unique… View Article

When deciding which tools to use with remote workers, think about the projects that you’ll need your remote team to complete, as well as how you want them to interact with your local team. You’ll want to choose tools that allow your teams to work efficiently and effectively. Since your organization will have a unique set of needs, you’ll have to carefully consider each option against your objectives to make sure that you’re on the right path.

Having said that, here are a few tools that we think your organization could benefit from if you work in remote setups:

1. When it comes to project management….

We, at Turing, use Trello for project management. It’s a great (free) way to plan your projects, distribute tasks and collaborate together. Asana is another project management tool that is both easy-to-use and a very effective way to plot and track projects. Even industry giants like Uber, AirBnB and Pinterest use Asana.

While these tools aren’t the most versatile, their pros well outweigh the cons and they are a great way to keep your remote workers on track and on schedule.

2. When it comes to communication…

At Turing, we use Slack for most of our internal communication. Slack is an online chatroom that works as a great platform for brainstorming, sharing files, comparing notes and much more. Slack organizes your conversations by channels, keeping things neat and clean.

3. Video is critical…

As for video interactions, we principally use Zoom for our all hands meetings, and Whereby for quicker small team conversations or sales call. There are pros and cons for each of these, but choosing the best tool for your team depends on your company’s specific communication needs. 

4. Especially for creatives…

While Turing is focused on engineering driven tasks, that doesn’t mean there aren’t creative components to our work. Members of the marketing and commucations team here have recently been exploring Milanote.

Key Features:
– Write notes & to-do lists, upload images & files and save things you find on the web
– Organize visually using the flexible drag and drop interface.
– Boards by default are a private place to think, but with a single click you can create a shared workspace for collaboration with your team
– Milanote is filled with hundreds of built-in templates to help you get started with a variety of different projects, from creating a mood board to writing that perfect creative brief.

Pricing:
– Free version available with no time limit.
– PRO version $9.99 per month (monthly and annual plans)

Below, have a quick look at the Milanote interface. It’s pretty.

Milanote Interface
Remote team management is essential to today’s modern workplace and an integral piece of the puzzle. The tools mentioned in this article should give you a good starting point when it comes to filling out your software stack and ensuring that you have all your communication bases covered.
By Apr 30, 2020
The Future of Work

The Future of Work is Remote

We believe there is a new way to build companies: have a smaller local engineering team, and amplify that with a distributed team of exceptional remote engineers.

This article originally appeared on Turing’s Medium.com page.

Working with Remote Engineers Made our Last Company Successful

Many of you know the Rover story. Vijay and I started our first company out of Stanford, raised venture capital, and took it all the way to a successful acquisition.

It had a secret.

The secret was our contrarian approach to hiring. When almost every engineering manager and VC in Silicon Valley preached the importance of everyone working from the same office, we took the unpopular stance that we would hire great people, regardless of where they worked from. We didn’t do this to make a point. It was absolutely necessary for us to look beyond Silicon Valley, to keep the quality bar high while keeping our costs low.

Silicon Valley has a growing talent shortage problem. Hiring top engineers locally is costly, and not scalable.

Turing was born from this insight. Turing lets you push a button and hire a pre-vetted engineer instantly from the global talent pool.

Turing makes scaling talent as effortless as scaling servers on AWS. It’s high quality talent on demand.

It is Hard to Scale an Engineering Team in Silicon Valley

With software eating the world, the demand for high-quality engineering talent has skyrocketed, and the local talent supply can no longer keep up. We hear about San Francisco’s housing and real estate problems, as well as visa/immigration issues regularly. Silicon Valley has hit human scaling limits, and it’s time to look beyond the valley for talent.

Employee retention data also paints a bleak picture. The average Silicon Valley engineer retains for 13 months. If you factor in the time to hire (~1–2 months), onboard (1–2 months), and handoff (0.5 months), you get about nine months of productive work. This is scary — and it’s a huge contributing factor to one in every ten startups failing in the first 12 months.

Deploy the World’s Talent at the Touch of a Button

Turing was started with one goal in mind: solve the tech talent shortage problem. Turing rigorously screens engineering talent from all over the world. In addition to technical skills, the platform vets for communication skills and fit for remote work.

It’s pay-as-you-go with no minimum commitment. You only pay for the hours worked. We take care of hour tracking, payments, and all the complexities of working with remote contractors, so you don’t have to. You simply push a button and go.

The Turing platform also ensures managing your remote team is easy. Historically, managing remote engineers has been a frustrating experience. If you’ve worked with remote engineers before, you might remember late night calls, communication issues, a lack of cohesion with the rest of your team, and a general sense of unease that you’re managing them less effectively than your local/on-premises team.

Turing will make remote work a joyful experience.

We start by ensuring there is adequate time zone overlap with the rest of your team. You need specific management processes to maximize productivity. Turing enforces these remote management best practices natively on the platform. Turing uses AI to assess ongoing developer productivity by building deep developer profiles based on actual work done. The AI analyzes data from code, Asana, Slack, email and various other communication platforms to ensure high quality of work.

Deep learning has opened a world of possibilities. We are working on automatically assessing developer skill based on actual work done, by building deep developer profiles. These are detailed, comprehensive and continuously updated. This helps with deeper matching and offering personalized career growth recommendations to engineers.

— Vijay Krishnan, CTO

Through a combination of automation, AI, and remote-native product design, Turing will make remote work a joyful experience for managers and their reports.

Talent is Universal, Opportunity is not

There is incredible engineering talent all over the world. Where you live should not have any bearing on where you work. We want to ensure the world doesn’t miss out on the potential of talented individuals, just because they were born in the wrong zip code. We find the Lost Einsteins of the world and give them what they desire more than anything else — opportunity.

The opportunity to participate in Silicon Valley, and change the world.

Despite growing up nearly 9000 miles from Silicon Valley, my co-founder Vijay and I had an opportunity to contribute to the Tech industry, because we met at Stanford and lived in the heart of the Valley. We envision a future where, thanks to platforms like Turing, the next generation of makers can change the world without needing to move to Silicon Valley.

Remote is the Future of Work

To hire world class talent, you have to look at the entire world when growing your team. With collaboration tools rapidly improving it’s easier than ever before to run a company as a combination of local and remote engineers. Slack, Asana, Trello, Jira, Blue Jeans and smartphones have made possible today what would have been inefficient or infeasible a decade ago

We believe there is a new way to build companies: have a smaller local engineering team, and amplify that with a distributed team of exceptional remote engineers.

We are designing the office of the future. A virtual work space that remote engineers love working from, in bits instead of atoms.

-Noa X, Head of Design

Many billion dollar companies rely heavily on remote/distributed teams. Fortune 500 companies also see the need to go remote.

We will Help you Change the World

Bold ideas change the world. You are working on something you are passionate about. Turing will help you change the world by making sure you have the right talent with you, at all times in your journey.

Turing has talent today. We are starting off with Frontend and Full Stack Engineers, and rapidly expanding to other software engineering roles, including iOS, Android, Backend, AI and Data Science.

Changing the world is hard — you have a million things to worry about. Now there’s one less thing.

We’re on a mission to help ambitious Founders, CTOs, and leaders succeed by giving them exceptional engineers from the global talent pool. How can we help you make your company or project successful? Let’s talk.

By Oct 2, 2019
Woman staring at laptop screen
Turing News

How to Run Meetings with Remote Employees

Advancements in technology have made the world a much smaller place, leading firms to create more global offices, remote teams, and therefore, hold more remote meetings. If you’re a manager, I’m sure you’ve had to schedule and operate some variation of a remote meeting at some point. If you have, I’m even more sure that… View Article

Advancements in technology have made the world a much smaller place, leading firms to create more global offices, remote teams, and therefore, hold more remote meetings.

If you’re a manager, I’m sure you’ve had to schedule and operate some variation of a remote meeting at some point. If you have, I’m even more sure that you’re aware of the challenges this process entails, such as disengaged workers, long run times, unclear communication, and so on.

If done effectively, however, remote meetings can be productive and efficient. Here are a few ways to run smooth and well-organized meetings with remote teams:

1. Don’t include everyone.

The number one reason why workers feel disengaged during remote meetings is simply because their presence is not required at the meeting. Instead of involving every employee at every meeting, it is important to identify which of your employees are essential and which are non-essential for each meeting. Time is the most precious commodity in the business world and by involving workers in a meeting who have no real reason to be there, you’re just wasting your and your workers’ time– time that they could spend getting important things done and being productive.

2. Create a collaborative agenda.

This should go for any meeting, but it is especially important to have an agenda for your remote meetings. Make sure that this agenda is known to your workers and that you get them to contribute to it. An agenda will help keep the discussion on track, while also giving your employees a voice.

3. Have local employees engage remotely in meetings, along with their remote co-workers.

This may seem like a pretty radical idea, but hear me out: if you work in a hybrid (part local and part remote) office, having your non-remote workers engage in the meeting from their desktops can be a great way to level the playing field, so to speak.

Remote workers often feel as though their voices go unheard; however, if everyone (irrespective of location) dials in from their respective devices, you’ll end up having a far more equal meeting where everyone feels important and essential. This will lead them to be more engaged during the meeting. This method works logistically and can prove to be far more time-effective as well.

4. Utilize tools to improve communication.

Using screen-sharing tools and online chat interfaces like Skype, you can replicate a real-life interaction to as close a degree as possible. I’m sure you’re aware of the more popular tools for these jobs, but here are a few lesser-known but equally (if not more) effective software:

  •       Join.me: fast video chatting with screen-sharing
  •       Zoom.us: meetings, webinars for over 100 employees at a time
  •       Appear.in: permanent video chat-room where people can join in/out anytime

5. Make sure that your remote employees are fairly represented in meetings, despite not physically being there.

Elect a representative for your remote teams to voice their opinions and concerns. This helps some of the more reserved workers to open up and voice their feelings without scrutiny. Having just one speaker per team can also help save time in meetings. Additionally, a remote representative can also help bypass issues that may come with remote workers not being fluent in your language. For example, if your remote team operates out of China and a lot of them aren’t fluent in English, it can be more comfortable and easier for them to report their concerns to an English speaking, Chinese representative who can then carry their opinions to you.

Conducting a productive meeting with remote employees may seem like a fool’s errand to some, however, with a few simple steps, you can make remote meetings just as successful as your local ones.

By Feb 28, 2019
Working from home on a laptop
Turing News

Overcoming Objections to Using Remote Teams

So, you’ve just proposed bringing on freelance workers at your company. While the numerous benefits seem obvious to you, you are instantly inundated with a barrage of questions. Fear not, we’ve all been there. Although freelancing/ remote working is a very popular trend in the business world, hiring them is still considered a radical idea…. View Article

So, you’ve just proposed bringing on freelance workers at your company. While the numerous benefits seem obvious to you, you are instantly inundated with a barrage of questions. Fear not, we’ve all been there. Although freelancing/ remote working is a very popular trend in the business world, hiring them is still considered a radical idea.

Here are a few common objections we hear and ways that you can overcome them:

1. “Will They Be Up to The Task?”

The essence of this question is quality, and it’s a legitimate concern. However, there are a few ways to ensure that you’re hiring top remote workers.

First, if possible, try to exclusively hire pre-vetted freelancers. Platforms, like Turing, provide companies access to hundreds of freelancers/ remote workers, from all over the world that are already screened, interviewed and tested.

If it is not possible to do so, then screen and test remote candidates yourself, during the interview process. It’s all about the deliverables, so give them a take home project that is typical of the work you would be assigning them, should they get the job. Once hired, start them off with smaller tasks that you can sign off on—this will allow you to spot any discrepancies in their work early on.

2. “How Will We Manage Them?”

A large part of finding the right freelancer is finding someone who works well with your management style. This involves as much introspection, as it does an outward search for the right candidate. First, know what kind of a manager you are and commence your search based on those conclusions.

Whenever possible, try to hire freelancers/ remote workers, who will keep the same (or a similar) schedule as you. Also, make sure to use clearly defined, time-sensitive OKRs, as this is a general management principle, really but is applicable in freelance structures as well.

3. “And What About Communication?”

It is a very popular concern that communication, in regards to freelance/ remote workers, across various geographic and cultural borders, is not practical. However, in the digital age, this really shouldn’t be a point of contention. Given the amount of technology available at your disposal, it is actually the best time to invest in freelance workers.

Learn more about effectively facilitating communication among remote and freelance teams, here.

4. “But, But, But—Cultural Differences!”

We hear this one A LOT, but here’s the thing: having workers from different cultures and nationalities isn’t a bad thing. In fact, it’s a great thing! By having a more culturally diverse and inclusive team, you’re doing your PR a world of good- in addition to boosting your team’s overall creativity and efficiency. Yes, you read that correctly. Teams that are culturally diverse are more likely to come up with creative breakthroughs and insight.

While the concept of hiring global, remote employees may seem like a precarious business decision, it is only a fact that this is the way of the future. With so much technology and global talent at our fingertips, it seems silly not to give hiring remotely a chance.

For pre-vetted global, remote workers, check out Turing’s website. We place the top 1% of job candidates with companies in need of their services. Our remote workers go through a series of background checks, interviews, and tests, before we place them with an assignment, assuring you that you only receive the best of the best in terms of talent, personality, and reliability.

By Feb 14, 2019
Person smiling in front of a laptop
Management

How to Make Remote Workers Feel Like Part of the Team

There are two answers to the question of how to make a remote worker feel like part of the team- a short one and a long one. The short answer is: Just be human. Treat your remote workers just as any other employee (just as any other person, rather). Be empathetic and be there for… View Article

There are two answers to the question of how to make a remote worker feel like part of the team- a short one and a long one.

The short answer is: Just be human. Treat your remote workers just as any other employee (just as any other person, rather). Be empathetic and be there for them in whatever capacity you need to or can be.

Sounds simple enough, right? And it is! But the easiest things are sometimes the hardest to implement. The following explains how to do just that:

1. Inclusion

Include your remote workers when it comes to planning and setting up tasks. Ask for their input and feedback instead of just assigning them predetermined tasks and projects. A simple, “What do you think?,” can go a long way.

2. Fly them out!

For many people that live in remote parts of the world, the prospect of flying out to the Silicon Valley may be a dream come true. Even if your remote workers don’t necessarily live that far away, flying your employees out can go a long way in terms of building respect and trust between you and them.

Beyond all of that, in terms of increased communication and team-bonding, this is a great idea.

3. Fly yourself out!

The next best thing to flying your remote workers out to you, is to fly yourself out to them. By learning about their local culture and trying to assimilate, you make yourself more personable and are able to build a more respectful and empathetic relationship.

4. Understand culturally important events.

In today’s environment, sensitivity to different cultures is critical. For instance, in Eastern Europe, birthdays are extremely important, so some companies send birthday cakes and decorations to remote workers’ houses and have an online celebration with the team. This is an example of a great gesture to show that you care about your employees and want to make an effort.

5. Meetings

When conducting meetings, you want to make sure that your remote employees truly feel included. A lot of times in group meetings, remote workers feel disengaged as a lot of the focus falls on those physically present in the office. One way to solve this problem is by having purely video-based meetings. This means that both local and remote workers dial in on separate, individual screens. This makes for a more balanced interaction, ensuring that no one feels left out. Lastly, make sure that your meeting notes are pre-distributed so that everyone has the same level of knowledge.

It’s all quite simple, really: treat all your employees fairly and equally. Respect the ambitions of your remote workers and be open to hearing them out, as well as implementing their ideas, if they choose to present them. If you follow these guidelines then your remote workers will be happy and feel as though they are a part of the office, even if they can’t actually be there.

By Feb 7, 2019
People walking over calendar painted on floor
Hiring developers

How to Keep Remote Software Teams on Schedule

For many managers, remote teams are deemed undesirable because of the manager’s inability to physically supervise them, ensuring that they’re staying on schedule and completing tasks in a timely manner. This concern can deter companies from hiring remotely, which is a shame due to all the benefits that come with employing remote workers- such as… View Article

For many managers, remote teams are deemed undesirable because of the manager’s inability to physically supervise them, ensuring that they’re staying on schedule and completing tasks in a timely manner.

This concern can deter companies from hiring remotely, which is a shame due to all the benefits that come with employing remote workers- such as increased productivity and innovation, as well as decreased costs.

Luckily, in this article, we’re going to explore some methods as to how to keep your remote software team on schedule.

1. Make sure that remote hires have both a passion for the project, as well as the necessary skills to successfully complete it.

During the hiring process, look for candidates with an obvious interest in the project that you’d potentially be hiring them to work on. After all, it’s no secret that an employee will be more dedicated to a project that they are passionate about.

Additionally, test during the hiring process that the employee possesses the skills that they need to complete the project to your standards. A skilled employee is less likely to get caught up in obstacles than one who is less proficient.

2. Make sure that you are aware of potential problems and how they may occur.

As a manager, being prepared for a disaster and knowing what to do in the event that it happens, is the best way to keep a team moving forward. When assigning a project to a remote employee, do your research first and have a plan in place in the event of the worst case scenario. This will ensure that if the problem pops up, you’ll be able to fix it quickly, while keeping the employee on schedule to complete the project.

3. Have regular check-ins so you know whether or not your remote employees are on schedule.

It’s difficult to feel as though you’re maintaining control over an employee when they aren’t with you in the office. Fortunately, with tools such as Skype, Google Hangouts, and Slack, it’s extremely easy to periodically check-in with remote workers.

Check-in using video chat or simply a text chat. Ask the employee what they’ve completed, what they’re currently working on, and what they have left on their agenda for the day. If anything seems like it’s taking longer than it should or you think that another part of the process needs to be prioritized, don’t hesitate to voice your concerns. Open communication is the biggest key to success when it comes to managing remote workers.

4. Assign deliverables to be completed in small chunks so that you have insight into how the project is going.

Break the overall project into small parts and assign due dates for each section. This way, you can see each part of the puzzle as it’s completed, giving you an early look as to how everything is going to fit together to form the final product.

Doing this will also allow you to catch any potential mistakes early on in development, saving everyone the headache of having to make corrections down the road.

5. Assign buddies to your remote workers.

Assigning buddies to remote employees is a great way to keep them on track. Additionally, by putting two minds together to complete a project, you’ll double their chances of success.

Buddies can be local employees or another remote employee- whichever you’d prefer. Either way, assigning pairs when it comes to remote work is an amazing way to increase productivity, problem-solving ability, and more.

6. Have a defined “problem escalation” process, which remote employees can use.

Similarly to our point in #2, acknowledging potential problems and deciding how to solve them before they happen, is a great strategy when it comes to keeping employees from drifting off course. Nothing causes a project to be set back like the unearthing of massive problem, late in the game.

While you, as a manager, should be aware of potential problems and methods for solving them, you should also make your remote employees aware of the problems and solutions. This way, if everything goes wrong, you’ll know that both you and your remote worker understand what went wrong and how to go about fixing it.

7. Have a plan for securing additional resources, in the event of a problem.

Should a problem arise, be sure that you have members of your local team on standby to help your remote employees out. When it comes to a crisis, you should have an “all hands on deck” policy, so that your remote worker doesn’t feel as though they’re an abandoned, sinking ship.

8. Build in extra time and resources.

If a project must absolutely be completed by a specific date, then be sure to start it early, setting the initial “due date” for weeks (or even months) before it is necessary to have it finalized. Additionally, take on the expense of being prepared by having extra resources available to employees while they work on the project.

Extra time and resources may seem unnecessary at the start of a project, however, you and your employees will be grateful for the cushion, should a problem occur.

Once again, when it comes to a project being completed by remote employees, knowing how to dodge and fix problems before it’s a necessity, is crucial to keeping remote workers on schedule.

A remote worker that winds up off-schedule wastes company time and money, potentially even throwing off the launch of a new product.

To get the most value out of your remote employees, you’ll need to adjust your management styles to allow for as little error as possible.

Getting the most out of remote workers starts with the people that you hire. At Turing, we thoroughly pre-vet our remote software engineers, requiring them go through multiple rounds of interviews, testing, and background checks. After that, we only accept the top 1% of applicants into our database, guaranteeing that our customers are matched to the highest quality remote workers.

Visit our website to start building your remote team with Turing.

By Feb 5, 2019