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Turing News

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition Save the Date: Thursday, October 15th, 11 AM – 2 PM PT   (Join and/or RSVP here) This Thursday, Turing not only introduces you to exciting new product innovations, but also brings together top remote-work experts and advocates in the inaugural Turing Boundaryless Product Event. Over the course of… View Article

Turing’s Boundaryless Product Event – Fall Edition

Save the Date: Thursday, October 15th, 11 AM – 2 PM PT   (Join and/or RSVP here)

This Thursday, Turing not only introduces you to exciting new product innovations, but also brings together top remote-work experts and advocates in the inaugural Turing Boundaryless Product Event. Over the course of the virtual event, learn how remote-distributed teams can turbo-charge your development, increase your runway, reduce fixed costs, and make your company more attractive to investors. Additionally, the event will allow you to:

  • Hear from scaling experts that have built world-leading products with remote teams. 
  • See the latest product innovations from Turing, the company building AWS for talent. 
  • Learn about the Future of Work with Ting Cai, formerly of Microsoft and now, Senior Director at Google

Please join Turing CEO, Jonathan Siddharth as well as special guests:

Registration and access to the event is free of charge — please RSVP and/or join us here.


Schedule of events:

Turing Product Launch Demo (11am – 11:45am) by Turing CEO and Co-Founder Jonathan Siddharth

Have a first look at Turing’s exciting new product innovations. See how hiring and managing Silicon Valley-caliber engineers can now be faster and easier than ever before.

Panel Discussion: Scaling with Remote Teams (11:45am – 12:25pm)  — by Prakash Gupta with, Dennis Payonk, and Richard Hong

Hear from current customers about their experience building engineering teams on top of Turing. Learn remote work best practices, how to avoid common mistakes, and more.

Fireside Chat with Ting Cai of Google, Ashu Garg of Foundation Capital, and Turing Co-Founder and CEO, Jonathan Siddharth on the Future of Remote Work (12:30pm – 1:30pm)

Join Jonathan Siddharth, Turing’s CEO and Co-Founder, Ashu Garg of Foundation Capital, and Ting Cai, formerly of Microsoft and now, Senior Director at Google, in a lively discussion about the future of work, moderated by TechCrunch reporter, Ingrid Lunden.

Turing Developer Stories — Building Great Products while Changing Lives (1:30pm – 2pm)

See first-hand how Turing changes the course of developers’ lives worldwide while helping customers scale engineering teams quickly, even amid a global pandemic.

Register for free here

Jonathan Siddarth, CEO & Co-Founder, Turing

Prakash Gupta, Founding CRO, Turing

Ting Cai, Senior Director at Google

Ashu Garg, GP, Foundation Capital Ashu Garg, GP, Foundation Capital

Richard Hong, Co-Founder at Pangaea

Dennis Payonk, VP of Engineering at VillageMD

By Oct 12, 2020
BoundarylessEnterprise

Learn how Turing helped Ohi Technologies hire Silicon Valley-caliber Remote Software Engineers

Ohi Technologies What does Ohi Technologies do? Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions. What challenges did they face? Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent… View Article

Ohi Technologies

What does Ohi Technologies do?

Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions.

What challenges did they face?

Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent on unsuccessful hires made the process costly and fraught with risk

In a prior role, VP of Engineering Nick Blanchet estimated it takes three months from start to finish to hire and onboard an engineer successfully. These challenges led Ohi Technologies to turn to Turing to fill their software development job vacancies. However, they initially felt that remote-distributed teams create other problems. Ohi was concerened having remote engineers would reduce transparency in productivity. Additionally, having a team of remote software developers would make it challenging to align time zones globally, and the overhead of performance management tracking and other HR responsibilities had the potential to slow them down. Not to mention that the overall cost of engineering in a highly competitive market was pricing them out.

How did Turing solve their problem?

Turing’s solution brought speed and efficiency to Ohi Technologies’ hiring process by providing pre-vetted and readily available engineers that could hit the ground running with minimal ramp-up.

“From the first call with Turing to hiring a team of three highly skilled software engineers that were able to start effectively handling tickets took less than one month.”

Additionally, Turing’s post-match product enabled their team to maintain productivity in a distributed team by providing visibility into their engineer’s daily activities. Turing also made collaboration and communication seamless by enforcing a required time zone overlap and daily updates. Turing’s approach to sourcing, vetting, and hiring remote engineering professionals globally at a very competitive cost enabled Ohi Technologies to find quality developers outside of high cost-of-living areas.

Results

Ohi Technologies was able to engage three Turing software engineers to scale their development quickly. The new hires enabled them to get their product to market rapidly and increase product demand and scalability. Ohi sees Turing as their long-term partner for building on-demand teams of engineers.

 

By Sep 9, 2020
COVID-19

The Post-COVID-19 Workplace

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Pressed suits and business trips have given way to Zoom calls made from the kitchen counter, and growing collections of drawstring pants. With more and more companies making increasingly long-term shifts to remote work, it leaves us wondering, what will the new ‘normal’ workplace entail?

Earlier this month, the BBC Visual and Data Journalism Team released a stunning rendition of a typical work day in the post-COVID-19 workplace. While many of their proposed changes to the workplace will come as obvious adaptations, some of their predictions may surprise you.

Architecture

The demand for large-scale office spaces is already dwindling, according to Hugh Pearman of the Royal Institute of British Architects. In their place, Pearman argues, will rise specially designed workplaces removed from bustling city centers.

Such workplaces will be smaller, and carefully designed to facilitate in-person meetings; which will likely only be held for collaboration and brainstorming with colleagues. Long-gone are the full work days of tapping away at a keyboard (you can do that from home).

“Touchless Technologies”

Additionally, new buildings will likely employ “touchless technologies” that take advantage of data science, face activation, and voice recognition. Furthermore, air conditioning may be equipped with UV lights to kill bacteria and viruses. Antimicrobial metals such as copper will be used in high-touch areas.

“The Shift Away from the City”

Pearman goes on to point to historical precedents of health concerns driving large scale infrastructure changes. It was concern of disease and air pollution in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that triggered population movements away from city centers into new and growing suburban areas.

“The Death of the City”, as a recent Politico article called it, blames COVID-19-induced telecommuting as the root cause of the urban flight taking place across the developed world. When employees realize they can work from anywhere, the lucky ones pick up and move for greener pastures.

“Making the Home Work”

With more people completing a greater portion of their jobs from home, the very idea of “home” is bound to shift as well. UK architect Grace Choi has already experienced these new demands, with more and more requests being made to incorporate home offices and work studios into new constructions.

According to Choi, “we’re all going to need to configure our space in a more intelligent way” as we adjust to a world of remote work structures.

We will all be adjusting in the months (and years) to come as we become hybrid workers – sometimes at home, sometimes at the office. One thing’s for sure however, remote work is here to stay.

By Aug 17, 2020