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Developer Testimonials

Why I quit freelancing and joined Turing

If you’re sick of freelancing and want to take your career to the next level, check out Turing for remote software jobs. I did, and I’ll never freelance again

I had been freelancing for a few years, and let me tell you: being a freelancer is tough. It’s hard to get a gig, deadlines are tight, and getting paid is a continual challenge.

After exploring almost all the freelancing websites out there (Guru, UpWork, Freelancing.com), I found I had huge competition, was only able to secure low hourly rates, and ended up working with demanding customers that knew little or nothing about how a mobile app or a web app is done. This meant lots of headaches and compensation that didn’t account for the fact I frequently ended up being both the designer and the developer, for the price of one!

This used to drive me nuts!

When I realized that those places wouldn’t give me what I wanted – and deserved – I went ahead and started to look for some clients on my own. I built a fancy website, enhanced my LinkedIn profile, and started a blog, in the hopes that (fingers crossed!) I could find the jobs I needed.

What I didn’t know is that this was just half of it. I still needed to get paid for the jobs I delivered, and most people wouldn’t pay me until they thought their product was done, but their product was NEVER done because they wouldn’t stop adding new features, often while refusing to pay for the additional work.

In other words, I was working really hard but still struggling to make good money.

That was before I discovered Turing. I’ll be honest; it takes some time to pass their tests. And if you’re not a skilled developer, you’re going to find out that their qualification exams are no joke. But if you’re experienced and talented, you’ll find that the time you invest in getting qualified for Turing’s platform is well worth the time you spend upfront.

I’ve been working for Turing over the last year now, and I’ll never go back to the struggle of freelancing again.

At Turing, I got “matched” to an American tech company and started to work only two weeks after the interview process. I’m integrated with a team of really good (and professional) people who treat me fairly and are always happy to help and share their knowledge. The money is sent directly to my bank account and always on time! I know it almost sounds too good to be true, but it’s not. If you’re looking for a remote software job and good at front-end, back-end, full-stack, React, Node, Angular, Swift, Python, or any of the nearly 100 skills supported on Turing’s platform, you owe it to yourself to do what I did. Take their tests, get an interview, then start getting paid what you’re worth.

But don’t take my word for it. Visit https://turing.com/jobs and see it for yourself! Working at Turing is a life-changing experience, and I’m looking forward to meeting you here. 🙂

By September 28, 2020
Developers Corner

Things to know to get hired as a Turing Engineer

To help you out, we’ve reached out to some Turing engineers who passed Turing’s tests with exceptionally high marks and are now enjoying their time working with Silicon Valley companies. We asked them to share what they think is most important for a software engineer to know or do before applying to Turing.

If you’re reading this, you’re likely a software developer who is considering applying for Turing.com. You might have just learned about Turing a few minutes ago, or you might have already gotten past the teaser coding problem on Turing’s landing page, created a profile, and are now staring at an extensive list of Turing tests. Either way, you (most likely a high-achieving and high-aspiring software developer) are on the right track. The number of high-profile silicon valley companies that hire  remote software developers through Turing  is increasing each week, and more than 160,000 software developers have signed up for Turing in its first year alone. You’re smart to be jumping on this opportunity now! But, if you’re like most developers, some part of you is likely starting to wonder if you’re sufficiently prepared to dive into the application.

Even the most seasoned software developers can get anxious in the days or hours leading up to a technical interview. So, to help you out, we’ve reached out to some Turing engineers who passed Turing’s tests with exceptionally high marks and are now enjoying a remote software job with top US companies. We asked them to share what they think is most important for a software engineer to know or do before applying to Turing. We even asked the primary designer of the Turing Tests himself, Turing’s VP of Engineering, Zan Doan, (previously an Engineering Manager at Facebook) to give his thoughts. Here is what they said:

1) Sharpen your problem-solving skills

First and foremost, as in any silicon valley technical interview process, Turing engineers are expected to be expert problem solvers, able to manipulate data structures and common algorithms to solve a variety of problems while optimizing for speed and efficiency. Everaldo, a Turing engineer based in Curitiba, Brasil, gave the following advice:

 “Turing applicants should familiarize themselves with sites like HackerRank and Codewars, where they can sharpen their problem-solving skills. They should also study dynamic programming and Big O notation to understand techniques for coding challenges, since, if you implement a naive solution, it will get a lower score or might timeout if the solution is quadratic or exponential.”

Everaldo also recommended studying the well-known book “Cracking the Coding Interview” by Gayle McDowell. Not a bad idea considering one can always count on seeing a few Stanford CS students crouched over that “little green CS bible” in the Stanford dining halls during the interview season. Mastering the material there will put you in a position to get the same caliber jobs that many of those same Stanford students are pursuing!

2) Know your tech stacks

One thing that is relatively unique about Turing’s tests is that you have the opportunity to demonstrate mastery in an array of tech stacks with which you’re familiar. Whether you’re a Swift iOS developer, a MongoDB + React + Node.js full-stack developer, a Frontend developer with expertise in Flutter, a Python developer capable of scaling a Django backend, or anything else, you can find corresponding tests on Turing’s platform. Dhyey, a Turing engineer based in Ahmedabad, India, says, “Make sure to take and pass as many tech stack tests as possible. Proving you have a range of skills will make you eligible for multiple roles and increase your chances of getting hired.”

Doing well on these specific tech stack tests might require a little review before you jump into them. Zech, a Turing engineer, based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, recommends you do the following:

 “Take a little time to lightly review anything about that particular technology or language you’re not very familiar with because the tests tend to assess your knowledge about it from end to end. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should dive into a full-on ‘study for exam mode’ but just refresh your knowledge of a few things. If you’ve used a language/technology professionally for some time, you should pass the test without much problem.”

3) Showcase your technical experience

Investing time into filling out all the details of your profile and past experiences may be a hassle, but it will give you an edge over other vetted candidates. Dhyey emphasizes this point saying, “since the process is highly competitive and there is very little human interaction, it is very crucial for your profile to accurately reflect your ability for you to get picked over other vetted candidates.”

If that alone doesn’t convince you of the importance of highlighting your past accomplishments, projects, and experiences, this is the area that Zan Doan, the primary designer of the Turing Tests, also believes is most important. He says: 

“The word I would use to describe the best Turing developers is ‘hands-on.’ Turing jobs often require developers to adapt to a startup environment and make an impact quickly. Because of this, Turing tests not only ask the candidates questions about their general work experience but also hands-on questions about detailed implementations.”

Showcasing your ability to excel in a hands-on environment by taking care to describe your past technical experiences in your profile accurately will prime you for success on Turing.

4) Finally, prepare your workspace for success.

The Turing application process is similar to any technical interview, with the added caveat that the online tests (and later on, the possible interview) are all done remotely, meaning you’re in charge of preparing your space. 

On this point, Zech recommends, “make sure you’re in a relaxed environment with little to no distractions. You’ll need to have a working and stable internet connection, especially since you can’t retake an exam within three months in the event you fail.”

Similarly, if you qualify for an interview, Everaldo says, “it’s just like a regular interview: be ready, on time, dress code, be polite, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Also, it helps to have a good setup for the interview. Have a strong Internet connection, headset, mic, and test the setup before the meeting.

And that’s about it! If you feel well-enough prepared in the above four areas, you should have no problem feeling confident clicking “start” to begin taking Turing’s tests or signing into a remote Turing interview. Silicon Valley opportunities are at your doorstep. The most beautiful thing about Turing’s application process is its hyper-focus on finding talent. We believe talent can be found anywhere and can be of all races and genders. And if, by chance, you’re not successful in your first shot at applying to Turing, a computer science education has become so democratized that we’re confident you can study up, come back, and succeed another day.  Remember, at Turing, we know that not only is talent universal, but opportunity as well.

Ready to get started? Apply to Turing’s remote software developer jobs now

By September 17, 2020
BoundarylessEnterprise

Learn how Turing helped Ohi Technologies hire Silicon Valley-caliber Remote Software Engineers

Ohi Technologies What does Ohi Technologies do? Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions. What challenges did they face? Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent… View Article

Ohi Technologies

What does Ohi Technologies do?

Ohi Technologies set out to build a 2-hour delivery platform for e-commerce companies utilizing smart warehouses and effective software solutions.

What challenges did they face?

Previously, hiring engineers at Ohi Technologies was a tedious process requiring a large pipeline of candidates. The amount of time and money spent on unsuccessful hires made the process costly and fraught with risk

In a prior role, VP of Engineering Nick Blanchet estimated it takes three months from start to finish to hire and onboard an engineer successfully. These challenges led Ohi Technologies to turn to Turing to fill their software development job vacancies. However, they initially felt that remote-distributed teams create other problems. Ohi was concerened having remote engineers would reduce transparency in productivity. Additionally, having a team of remote software developers would make it challenging to align time zones globally, and the overhead of performance management tracking and other HR responsibilities had the potential to slow them down. Not to mention that the overall cost of engineering in a highly competitive market was pricing them out.

How did Turing solve their problem?

Turing’s solution brought speed and efficiency to Ohi Technologies’ hiring process by providing pre-vetted and readily available engineers that could hit the ground running with minimal ramp-up.

“From the first call with Turing to hiring a team of three highly skilled software engineers that were able to start effectively handling tickets took less than one month.”

Additionally, Turing’s post-match product enabled their team to maintain productivity in a distributed team by providing visibility into their engineer’s daily activities. Turing also made collaboration and communication seamless by enforcing a required time zone overlap and daily updates. Turing’s approach to sourcing, vetting, and hiring remote engineering professionals globally at a very competitive cost enabled Ohi Technologies to find quality developers outside of high cost-of-living areas.

Results

Ohi Technologies was able to engage three Turing software engineers to scale their development quickly. The new hires enabled them to get their product to market rapidly and increase product demand and scalability. Ohi sees Turing as their long-term partner for building on-demand teams of engineers.

 

By September 9, 2020
Turing Announces $14 Million Seed Round
Turing News

Turing Announces $14 Million Seed Round led by Foundation Capital

Company will use the additional capital to accelerate the global shift to remote work Today marks a giant milestone in the history of Turing. The company is delighted to announce its oversubscribed seed round of $14 million. Turing is proud of the support we’ve received from top-tier VCs and prescient investors who share our belief… View Article

Company will use the additional capital to accelerate the global shift to remote work

Today marks a giant milestone in the history of Turing. The company is delighted to announce its oversubscribed seed round of $14 million. Turing is proud of the support we’ve received from top-tier VCs and prescient investors who share our belief that the future of work is boundaryless and that remote-distributed teams democratize opportunity for talented developers wherever they may live.

Investors in Turing’s seed round include Foundation Capital led by Ashu Garg, Adam D’Angelo, Facebook’s first CTO & CEO of Quora, Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, Beerud Sheth, founder of Upwork, Jeff Morris Jr., as well as executives from Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft and Amazon.

According to Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth, “We were already growing fast prior to the coronavirus crisis. I think remote work is here to say. COVID has accelerated a shift that was already underway. We’ve seen a 5-year shift play out in the last 5 months. A lot of companies that want to go remote-first still face key obstacles on sourcing, vetting & managing remote developers. It’s really hard to find silicon valley caliber developers who are remote. It’s hard to evaluate developers who are remote. It can also be frustrating to communicate with remote developers across different timezones. Often the right kind of daily, weekly syncs don’t happen. It’s hard to manage performance. That’s why we built Turing. Turing is creating a new category of verticalized remote work in the cloud. It’s a cloud of developers, that’s sourced by software, vetted by software, matched by software and managed by software. It’s AWS for Talent. What if, you could “push a button” to hire and manage remote developers?” 

The company will use the additional capital to keep scaling the business, investing in continued automation, AI initiatives to source, vet and manage remote developers.

According to Ashu Garg, General Partner at Foundation Capital, “When the Indian outsourcing and IT revolution was in its infancy, I predicted that the market would grow 100X over the next decade. People thought I was crazy at the time and, in retrospect, my prediction seems like a gross underestimation. I feel the same way about Turing. We are creating a new category around remote and distributed work. The future of work is remote, and we’re just getting started.”

Turing’s Founding Story

Turing was founded based upon the idea that talent is universal while opportunities are not. The company’s mission is to find the best developers from all over the world and match them with companies building world-changing products. 

Turing is co-founded by Jonathan Siddharth and Vijay Krishan. The duo discovered the power of using remote teams to build a company during their last venture, Rover, which the two started while still attending Stanford. SaysTuring CTO, Vijay Krishnan, “The cost and challenge of competing with Google, Facebook, Apple, and other giant Silicon Valley companies led us to source highly skilled remote developers from around the world.  What we learned building a company with a fully distributed team convinced us that remote-distributed teams are the future of work.”

Their experience at Rover provided the skills and knowledge that made them the perfect team to launch Turing. Turing’s data science powered platform offers a vertically-integrated solution for companies to spin up engineering teams the same way AWS lets companies instantly add additional server capacity.

Looking towards the Future

Turing will create 1000 jobs for remote engineers by 2022. The goal of the business is to provide Silicon Valley caliber jobs to the top 1% of developers from all over the world, help businesses scale at the push of a button, and level the playing field for the world’s best developers. 

Turing’s founders believe that the future of tech is boundaryless. The company is powering the remote revolution by making it fast, simple, and cost-effective to add exceptional talent to any team, and then to monitor and manage your people no matter where they live.

About Turing:

Turing is an automated platform that lets companies “push a button” to hire and manage remote developers. Turing uses artificial intelligence and data science to source, vet, match, and manage remote developers from all over the world. Turing currently has 160K developers on our platform from almost every country in the world.

Turing’s mission is to help every remote-first tech company build boundaryless teams. Turing’s backers include Foundation Capital, Adam D’Angelo, Facebook’s first CTO & the current CEO of Quora, Gokul Rajaram, Cyan Banister, Jeff Morris, and executives from Google and Facebook. The Information, Entrepreneur, and other major publications have profiled Turing.

About Jonathan Siddharth, Co-Founder, CEO

Jonathan is the CEO  and Co-Founder of Turing.com. Before starting Turing, Jonathan was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Foundation Capital, following the successful sale of his previous AI company, Rover that focused on deep personalization of content recommendations. Jonathan received the best Masters Thesis Award in Computer Science at Stanford University where he specialized in Artificial Intelligence while building AI-enabled products. In his spare time, Jonathan likes helping early-stage entrepreneurs scale companies and tinkering with AI projects.

You can find him Jonathan @jonsidd on Twitter and [email protected] His LinkedIn is https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonsid/.

About Vijay Krishnan, Co-Founder, CTO

Vijay Krishnan is the Co-Founder & CTO of Turing.com. At Turing Vijay leads data science efforts that inform automation in vetting, matching, and managing remote developers. Before co-founding Turing, Vijay was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Foundation Capital following the successful sale of his last AI company, Rover, a business he co-founded while at Stanford. Before Rover, Vijay was a scientist at Yahoo’s Data Mining and Research group. His work led to patented methods to increase Yahoo’s large-scale text categorization accuracy with profound implications for search relevance, ad-matching, user, and content personalization efforts.  

Vijay has a master’s degree in computer science from Stanford University, specializing in AI. Vijay is recently married and lives in Palo Alto, California. You can find Vijay on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Media Contact  —   Oliver Starr, Head of Content    —   [email protected]    — 530-641-3999

By September 2, 2020
COVID-19

The Post-COVID-19 Workplace

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began in early spring of 2020, Few aspects of life have changed more than the workplace. A recent Stanford study reported that upwards of 42% of Americans are now working from home full-time (compared to just 7% pre-COVID-19).

Pressed suits and business trips have given way to Zoom calls made from the kitchen counter, and growing collections of drawstring pants. With more and more companies making increasingly long-term shifts to remote work, it leaves us wondering, what will the new ‘normal’ workplace entail?

Earlier this month, the BBC Visual and Data Journalism Team released a stunning rendition of a typical work day in the post-COVID-19 workplace. While many of their proposed changes to the workplace will come as obvious adaptations, some of their predictions may surprise you.

Architecture

The demand for large-scale office spaces is already dwindling, according to Hugh Pearman of the Royal Institute of British Architects. In their place, Pearman argues, will rise specially designed workplaces removed from bustling city centers.

Such workplaces will be smaller, and carefully designed to facilitate in-person meetings; which will likely only be held for collaboration and brainstorming with colleagues. Long-gone are the full work days of tapping away at a keyboard (you can do that from home).

“Touchless Technologies”

Additionally, new buildings will likely employ “touchless technologies” that take advantage of data science, face activation, and voice recognition. Furthermore, air conditioning may be equipped with UV lights to kill bacteria and viruses. Antimicrobial metals such as copper will be used in high-touch areas.

“The Shift Away from the City”

Pearman goes on to point to historical precedents of health concerns driving large scale infrastructure changes. It was concern of disease and air pollution in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that triggered population movements away from city centers into new and growing suburban areas.

“The Death of the City”, as a recent Politico article called it, blames COVID-19-induced telecommuting as the root cause of the urban flight taking place across the developed world. When employees realize they can work from anywhere, the lucky ones pick up and move for greener pastures.

“Making the Home Work”

With more people completing a greater portion of their jobs from home, the very idea of “home” is bound to shift as well. UK architect Grace Choi has already experienced these new demands, with more and more requests being made to incorporate home offices and work studios into new constructions.

According to Choi, “we’re all going to need to configure our space in a more intelligent way” as we adjust to a world of remote work structures.

We will all be adjusting in the months (and years) to come as we become hybrid workers – sometimes at home, sometimes at the office. One thing’s for sure however, remote work is here to stay.

By August 17, 2020
Most popular
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